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Labour Force Status and Sexual Orientation

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  • KAREN LEPPEL

Abstract

This study explores the probabilities of being employed, unemployed, and not in the labour force, for men and women in same-sex couples and married and unmarried opposite-sex couples. Same-sex partners were more likely to be unemployed than married opposite-sex partners but less likely than unmarried opposite-sex partners. Laws prohibiting sexual orientation discrimination had positive and larger effects on unemployment for same-sex partners than for other partners. The presence of young children increased the probability of being out of the labour force more for male same-sex partners than for other men, and less for female same-sex partners than for other women. Copyright (c) The London School of Economics and Political Science 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Leppel, 2009. "Labour Force Status and Sexual Orientation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(301), pages 197-207, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:76:y:2009:i:301:p:197-207
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Amélie Lafrance & Casey Warman & Frances Woolley, 2009. "Sexual Identity And The Marriage Premium," Working Papers 1219, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    2. Antecol, Heather & Steinberger, Michael D., 2009. "Female Labor Supply Differences by Sexual Orientation: A Semi-Parametric Decomposition Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 4029, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Benjamin Cerf, 2016. "Sexual Orientation, Income, and Stress at Work," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 546-575, October.
    4. Stijn Baert, 2014. "Career lesbians. Getting hired for not having kids?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(6), pages 543-561, November.
    5. Stevenson, Adam, 2012. "The Labor Supply and Tax Revenue Consequences of Federal Same-Sex Marriage Legalization," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 65(4), pages 783-806, December.
    6. Moberg, Ylva, 2016. "Does the gender composition in couples matter for the division of labor after childbirth?," Working Paper Series 2016:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Jaba, Elisabeta & Balan, Christiana & Roman, Mihai & Roman, Monica, 2010. "Statistical evaluation of spatial concentration of unemployment by gender," MPRA Paper 25161, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2010.
    8. Bell, Myrtle P. & Özbilgin, Mustafa F. & Beauregard, T. Alexandra & Sürgevil, Olca, 2011. "Voice, silence, and diversity in 21st century organizations: strategies for inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender employees," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 32094, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Thierry Laurent & Ferhat Mihoubi, 2017. "Sexual Orientation, Unemployment and Participation: Are Gays Less Employable than Straights?," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 1-44, March.
    10. Moberg, Ylva, 2016. "Does the gender composition in Couples matter for the division of labor after childbirth?," Working Paper Series 2016:8, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    11. Karen Leppel, 2016. "The incidence of self-employment by sexual orientation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 347-363, March.
    12. Lisa Giddings & John Nunley & Alyssa Schneebaum & Joachim Zietz, 2014. "Birth Cohort and the Specialization Gap Between Same-Sex and Different-Sex Couples," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 509-534, April.
    13. Stephan Humpert, 2012. "Somewhere over the Rainbow: Sexual Orientation Discrimination in Germany," Working Paper Series in Economics 245, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    14. Doris Weichselbaumer, 2013. "Discrimination in gay and lesbian lives," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 15, pages 236-254 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2016. "Occupational segregation by sexual orientation in the U.S.: Exploring its economic effects on same-sex couples," Working Papers 425, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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