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Asymmetric Substitutability: Theory And Some Applications

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  • KRIS DE JAEGHER

Abstract

"Economists usually describe goods as being either (gross) complements or (gross) substitutes. Yet, what is less known is that one good may be a gross substitute for a second good, while the second good is a gross complement to the first good. This article develops a theory of asymmetric gross substitutability and suggests some potential examples and applications." ("JEL" D11) Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Kris De Jaegher, 2009. "Asymmetric Substitutability: Theory And Some Applications," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(4), pages 838-855, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:47:y:2009:i:4:p:838-855
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. K.J.M. De Jaegher, 2010. "Giffen Behaviour and Asymmetric Substitutability," Working Papers 10-16, Utrecht School of Economics.
    2. Yang, Shilei & Shi, Victor & Jackson, Jonathan E., 2015. "Manufacturers׳ channel structures when selling asymmetric competing products," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 170(PB), pages 641-651.
    3. Banerjee, Dyuti S. & Chatterjee, Ishita, 2014. "Exploring Stackelberg profit ordering under asymmetric product differentiation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 309-315.
    4. Andrikopoulos, Athanasios & Markellos, Raphael N., 2015. "Dynamic interaction between markets for leasing and selling automobiles," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 260-270.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory

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