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Television Viewing, Fast-Food Consumption, And Children'S Obesity

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  • HUNG-HAO CHANG
  • RODOLFO M. NAYGA

Abstract

"Childhood obesity is rising in Taiwan and is becoming a major public health issue. This article examines the effect of children's TV viewing and fast-food consumption on childhood obesity. Using a nationwide survey data in Taiwan and a two-step estimation procedure, our results show that TV viewing hours and fast-food consumption are correlated. After controlling for the endogeneity, we find these two activities positively contribute to children's body weight and the increased risk of being overweight. Results suggest that public health/childhood obesity programs should educate parents of the critical influence of TV viewing and fast-food consumption on childhood obesity. The government can also encourage the fast-food industry to develop and sell healthier foods for children and provide point of sale nutritional information of these products". ("JEL "I12, I18) Copyright (c) 2009 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Hung-Hao Chang & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2009. "Television Viewing, Fast-Food Consumption, And Children'S Obesity," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(3), pages 293-307, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:27:y:2009:i:3:p:293-307
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Georgia S. Papoutsi & Andreas C. Drichoutis & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr., 2013. "The Causes Of Childhood Obesity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(4), pages 743-767, September.
    2. Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "The effects of old and new media on children's weight," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(10), pages 1008-1018, February.
    3. Chang, Hung-Hao, 2014. "Food Preparation for the School Lunch Program and Body Weight of Elementary School Children in Taiwan," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 17(1).
    4. Akpalu, Wisdom & Zhang, Xu, 2014. "Fast-food consumption and child body mass index in China: Application of an endogenous switching regression model," WIDER Working Paper Series 139, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Ehmke, Mariah D. & Willson, Tina M. & Schroeter, Christiane & Hart, Ann Marie & Coupal, Roger H., 2009. "Obesity Economics for the Western United States," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 8(02).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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