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Food Preparation for the School Lunch Program and Body Weight of Elementary School Children in Taiwan

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  • Chang, Hung-Hao

Abstract

In investigating the association between the school lunch programs and children's body weight, this study focuses on the school lunch programs in Taiwan. Using a national representative dataset of elementary schoolchildren, we estimate a mixed multinomial logit model to cope with the potential endogeneity issue, and examine how different types of food preparations for school meal programs may affect children's weight in different ways. The results indicate that children who go to schools which serve lunch meals prepared by school kitchens tend to have lower weight on average. In contrast, children who go to schools offering lunch boxes purchased from outside restaurants tend to have higher weight on average. From a policy standard point of view, our findings could shed some light on how school lunch policy can be designed to help prevent children's obesity.

Suggested Citation

  • Chang, Hung-Hao, 2014. "Food Preparation for the School Lunch Program and Body Weight of Elementary School Children in Taiwan," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 0(Issue 1), pages 1-16, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:163352
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/163352/files/20130073.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel L. Millimet & Rusty Tchernis & Muna Husain, 2010. "School Nutrition Programs and the Incidence of Childhood Obesity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(3).
    2. Hung-Hao Chang & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2009. "Television Viewing, Fast-Food Consumption, And Children'S Obesity," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(3), pages 293-307, July.
    3. John S. Akin & David K. Guilkey & Barry M. Popkin & James H. Wyckoff, 1983. "The Demand for School Lunches: An Analysis of Individual Participation in the School Lunch Program," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(2), pages 213-230.
    4. Sandra L. Hofferth & Sally Curtin, 2005. "Poverty, food programs, and childhood obesity," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 703-726.
    5. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    6. Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, 2009. "Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(3).
    7. Partha Deb & Chenghui Li & Pravin K. Trivedi & David M. Zimmer, 2006. "The effect of managed care on use of health care services: results from two contemporaneous household surveys," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(7), pages 743-760.
    8. Partha Deb & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2006. "Specification and simulated likelihood estimation of a non-normal treatment-outcome model with selection: Application to health care utilization," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 9(2), pages 307-331, July.
    9. repec:mpr:mprres:6163 is not listed on IDEAS
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