IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/canjag/v56y2008i3p243-256.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Assessing Producer Stated Preferences for Identity Preservation in the Canadian Grain Handling and Transportation System

Author

Listed:
  • Darren Barber
  • Jill Hobbs
  • James Nolan

Abstract

"Agricultural biotechnology will create a new set of challenges for the bulk grain handling and transportation system (GHTS) in Canada. The implementation of a credible grain identity preservation system to segregate genetically modified (GM) from non-GM grain remains an important and unresolved issue for the industry. Furthermore, the attitude of producers toward the design of an identity preserved grain supply chain is not well understood. Using a 2003 survey of Saskatchewan grain farmers developed by the authors, we employ conjoint analysis to evaluate producer attitudes and trade-offs among four hypothetical grain handling systems. The results indicate that farmers in the region will require significant economic incentives to adopt on-farm segregation methods when compared to methods that segregate grain at the elevator level." Copyright (c) 2008 Canadian Agricultural Economics Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Darren Barber & Jill Hobbs & James Nolan, 2008. "Assessing Producer Stated Preferences for Identity Preservation in the Canadian Grain Handling and Transportation System," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(3), pages 243-256, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:canjag:v:56:y:2008:i:3:p:243-256
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1744-7976.2008.00127.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wuyang Hu, 2004. "Trading off health, environmental and genetic modification attributes in food," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 31(3), pages 389-408, September.
    2. Jill E. Hobbs, 1996. "Transaction costs and slaughter cattle procurement: Processors' selection of supply channels," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(6), pages 509-523.
    3. repec:oup:revage:v:27:y:2005:i:2:p:212-228. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Barry E. Prentice & Dave Benell, 1992. "Determinants of Empty Returns by U.S. Refrigerated Trucks: Conjoint Analysis Approach," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 40(1), pages 109-127, March.
    5. Wallace E. Huffman, 2003. "Consumers' Acceptance of (and Resistance to) Genetically Modified Foods in High-Income Countries: Effects of Labels and Information in an Uncertain Environment," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1112-1118.
    6. William W. Wilson & Bruce L. Dahl, 2005. "Costs and Risks of Testing and Segregating Genetically Modified Wheat," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(2), pages 212-228.
    7. Belcher, Ken & Nolan, James & Phillips, Peter W.B., 2005. "Genetically modified crops and agricultural landscapes: spatial patterns of contamination," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 387-401, May.
    8. Catherine Halbrendt & J. Richard Bacon & John Pesek, 1992. "Weighted least squares analysis for conjoint studies: The case of hybrid striped bass," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(2), pages 187-198.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:canjag:v:56:y:2008:i:3:p:243-256. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/caefmea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.