IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/brjirl/v47y2009i4p723-740.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Worker Control as a Facilitator in the Match between Education and Jobs

Author

Listed:
  • Johanna Weststar

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between worker control and subjective underemployment among workers who have more education than is needed for entry into their jobs (credential underemployment). Results indicate that social and technical controls are related to a greater sense of education-job matching. Workers who have credential underemployment are less likely to report subjective underemployment (underutilization and lack of fit between education and job) if they have higher levels of workplace control. This article contains implications for job design and the role of employers and managers in fostering the utilization of their workforces. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Johanna Weststar, 2009. "Worker Control as a Facilitator in the Match between Education and Jobs," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(4), pages 723-740, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:47:y:2009:i:4:p:723-740
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2009.00737.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2005:i:2:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Green, Francis & McIntosh, Steven & Vignoles, Anna, 2002. "The Utilization of Education and Skills: Evidence from Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 70(6), pages 792-811, December.
    3. Frenette, Marc & Morissette, Rene, 2003. "Will They Ever Converge? Earnings of Immigrants and Canadian-born Workers over the Last Two Decades," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003215e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Mikal Skuterud, 2005. "Explaining the deteriorating entry earnings of Canada's immigrant cohorts, 1966 - 2000," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 641-672, May.
    5. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette, 2000. "Overeducation in the labor market: a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 149-158, April.
    6. Francis Green, 2008. "Leeway for the Loyal: A Model of Employee Discretion," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(1), pages 1-32, March.
    7. Khan, Linda J. & Morrow, Paula C., 1991. "Objective and subjective underemployment relationships to job satisfaction," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 211-218, May.
    8. Francis Green & Steven McIntosh, 2007. "Is there a genuine under-utilization of skills amongst the over-qualified?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 427-439.
    9. Erdal Atukeren & Aniela Wirz, 2005. "An analysis of perceived overqualification in the Swiss labor market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(2), pages 1-10.
    10. Frenette, Marc, 2004. "The overqualified Canadian graduate: the role of the academic program in the incidence, persistence, and economic returns to overqualification," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 29-45, February.
    11. Malcolm Brynin, 2002. "Overqualification in Employment," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 16(4), pages 637-654, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Muge Adalet McGowan & Dan Andrews, 2015. "Skill Mismatch and Public Policy in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1210, OECD Publishing.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:47:y:2009:i:4:p:723-740. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.