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Institutional Change in Advanced Political Economies

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  • Kathleen Thelen

Abstract

The political-economic institutions that have traditionally reconciled economic efficiency with social solidarity in the advanced industrial countries, and specifically in the so-called 'coordinated market economies', are indisputably under pressure today. However, scholars disagree on the trajectory and significance of the institutional changes we can observe in many of these countries, and they generally lack the conceptual tools that would be necessary to resolve these disagreements. This article attempts to break through this theoretical impasse by providing a framework for determining the direction, identifying the mode, and assessing the meaning of the changes we can observe in levels of both economic coordination and social solidarity. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2009.

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  • Kathleen Thelen, 2009. "Institutional Change in Advanced Political Economies," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 471-498, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:47:y:2009:i:3:p:471-498
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    Cited by:

    1. Oberfichtner, Michael & Schnabel, Claus, 2017. "The German model of industrial relations: (Where) does it still exist?," Discussion Papers 102, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    2. Oberfichtner, Michael & Schnabel, Claus, 2017. "The German model of industrial relations: (Where) does it still exist?," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 20/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    3. Marsden, David, 2015. "The future of the German industrial relations model," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62932, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. David Marsden, 2015. "The Future of the German Industrial Relations Model," CEP Discussion Papers dp1344, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. John T. Addison & Paulino Teixeira & Katalin Evers & Lutz Bellmann, 2016. "Is the Erosion Thesis Overblown? Alignment from Without in Germany," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 415-443, July.
    6. Dionysia Katelouzou & Mathias Siems, 2015. "Disappearing Paradigms in Shareholder Protection: Leximetric Evidence for 30 Countries, 1990-2013," Working Papers wp467, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Lim Sijeong, 2015. "Financial structures, firms, and the welfare states in South Korea and Singapore," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 327-354, August.
    8. Luis Bernardo Mejia Guinand, 2016. "The Changing Role of the Central Planning Offices in Latin America," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 477-491, December.
    9. Markus Grillitsch, 2014. "Regional Transformation: Institutional Change and Economic Evolution in Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1481, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Grillitsch, Markus, 2014. "Institutional Change and Economic Evolution in Regions," Papers in Innovation Studies 2014/1, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    11. Jean-Frédéric Morin & Sara Bannerman, 2015. "Tigers and Dragons at the World Intellectual Property Organization," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/186312, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

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