IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ausecr/v51y2018i3p368-381.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Work Me Not Into Temptation: Exploring the Relationship between Work and Healthy Eating in Dieters Using Data from the HILDA Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Heather Brown
  • Justin Presseau

Abstract

We explore if competing demands measured in terms of market and non‐market activities impact on dieters’ resolve to eat healthily. The analysis uses data from 2007 and 2009 of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics of Australia (HILDA) survey. The estimation strategy employs a random effects maximum likelihood estimator. For women, being unemployed is negatively associated with healthy eating whereas having young children is positively associated with healthy eating. For both genders, being divorced is negatively associated with healthy eating. Working in higher socioeconomic occupations is positively associated with healthy eating.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Brown & Justin Presseau, 2018. "Work Me Not Into Temptation: Exploring the Relationship between Work and Healthy Eating in Dieters Using Data from the HILDA Survey," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(3), pages 368-381, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:51:y:2018:i:3:p:368-381
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8462.12269
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Kassenboehmer, Sonja C. & Schurer, Stefanie, 2014. "Healthy habits: The connection between diet, exercise, and locus of control," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 1-28.
    2. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1992. "Testing for Selectivity Bias in Panel Data Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(3), pages 681-703, August.
    3. Lakdawalla, Darius & Philipson, Tomas, 2009. "The growth of obesity and technological change," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 283-293, December.
    4. Sinéad Furey & Christopher Strugnell & Ms. McIlveen, 2001. "An investigation of the potential existence of ``food deserts'' in rural and urban areas of Northern Ireland," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 18(4), pages 447-457, December.
    5. Grossman, Michael, 2006. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," Handbook of the Economics of Education,, Elsevier.
    6. Dolan, Paul & Peasgood, Tessa & White, Mathew, 2008. "Do we really know what makes us happy A review of the economic literature on the factors associated with subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-122, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:51:y:2018:i:3:p:368-381. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mimelau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.