IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ausecr/v26y1993i4p65-76.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Immigrants and the Use of Government Transfer Payments

Author

Listed:
  • S. A. Maani

Abstract

This article examines the use of government benefits and allowances by Australian immigrants relative to their native‐born counterparts. The study extends the Australian literature by employing micro‐level (Australian Longitudinal Survey) data, controlling for a number of relevant variables including first or second generation immigrant status and the nature of transfer payments received. The data on young adults employed in the study provide a comparable population for examining the relative use of benefits among those of similar age, allowing comparisons based on only the relevant types of benefits. The results consistently reject the hypothesis that immigrants are disproportionately using benefit payments and thereby imposing a burden on public funds. These results are of interest, especially since Australia is already a major immigrant‐receiving country, and since the Australian welfare system is more extensive in its coverage than most other immigrant‐receiving countries.

Suggested Citation

  • S. A. Maani, 1993. "Immigrants and the Use of Government Transfer Payments," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 26(4), pages 65-76, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:26:y:1993:i:4:p:65-76
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8462.1993.tb00812.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8462.1993.tb00812.x
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1111/j.1467-8462.1993.tb00812.x?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. George J. Borjas, 1992. "Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 123-150.
    2. George J. Borjas & Stephen J. Trejo, 1991. "Immigrant Participation in the Welfare System," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(2), pages 195-211, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thomas K. Bauer, 2002. "Migration, Sozialstaat und Zuwanderungspolitik," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 71(2), pages 249-271.
    2. Jorgen Hansen & Magnus Lofstrom, 2003. "Immigrant Assimilation and Welfare Participation Do Immigrants Assimilate Into or Out of Welfare?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    3. Eva Moreno-Galbis, 2020. "Minimum wage and immigrants' participation in the welfare system: evidence from France," Working Papers halshs-02862874, HAL.
    4. Daina McDonald, 2006. "150 Issues of The Australian Economic Review: The Changing Face of a Journal over Time," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2006n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Núria Rodríguez-Planas, 2013. "Determinants of immigrants’ cash-welfare benefits intake in Spain," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 167-180, May.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. George J. Borjas & Lynette Hilton, 1996. "Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant Participation in Means-Tested Entitlement Programs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 575-604.
    2. Noel Gaston & Douglas R. Nelson, 2013. "Bridging Trade Theory And Labour Econometrics: The Effects Of International Migration," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(1), pages 98-139, February.
    3. Morey, Edward R. & Kritzberg, David, 2012. "It's not where you do it, it's who you do it with?," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 176-191.
    4. Claudia Senik & Thierry Verdier, 2011. "Segregation, entrepreneurship and work values: the case of France," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1207-1234, October.
    5. Senik, Claudia, 2014. "The French unhappiness puzzle: The cultural dimension of happiness," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 379-401.
    6. Roger Penn & Paul Lambert, 2001. "SOR Models and Ethnicity Data in LIS and LES: Country by Country Report," LIS Working papers 260, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    7. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2020. "Cultural Transmission, Education-Promoting Attitudes, and Economic Development," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 37, pages 173-194, July.
    8. Deepti Goel & Kevin Lang, 2019. "Social Ties and the Job Search of Recent Immigrants," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 72(2), pages 355-381, March.
    9. Litina, Anastasia, 2012. "Unfavorable land endowment, cooperation, and reversal of fortune," MPRA Paper 39702, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Javier Torres & Fiorella Parra & Jorge Rubio, 2018. "Transmisión educativa intergeneracional en el Perú: un cálculo para las generaciones nacidas entre 1950-1989," Revista Economía, Fondo Editorial - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, vol. 41(81), pages 101-124.
    11. Delia Furtado, 2012. "Human Capital And Interethnic Marriage Decisions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(1), pages 82-93, January.
    12. Ildefonso Mendez & Gema Zamarro, 2018. "The intergenerational transmission of noncognitive skills and their effect on education and employment outcomes," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 521-560, April.
    13. Schiff, Maurice, 1999. "Trade, migration, and welfare : the impact of social capital," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2044, The World Bank.
    14. Edward O’Boyle, 2011. "The Acting Person: Social Capital and Sustainable Development," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 40(1), pages 79-98, April.
    15. Azarnert, Leonid V., 2010. "Immigration, fertility, and human capital: A model of economic decline of the West," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 431-440, December.
    16. Cécile BATISSE & Nong ZHU, 2009. "L’effet des politiques sociales sur l’emploi des nouveaux immigrants à Montréal :une analyse longitudinale et conjoncturelle," Working Papers 200925, CERDI.
    17. Luthra, Renee Reichl & Soehl, Thomas, 2014. "Who assimilates? Statistical artefacts and intergenerational mobility in immigrant families," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    18. Lucht, Michael & Haas, Anette, 2015. "The productivity effect of migrants : wage cost advantages and heterogeneous firms," IAB Discussion Paper 201505, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    19. Michael Lucht & Anette Haas, 2012. "Heterogeneous Firms and Substitution by Tasks: the Productivity Effect of Migrants," ERSA conference papers ersa12p894, European Regional Science Association.
    20. Pargal, Sheoli & Gilligan, Daniel & Huq, Mainul, 2000. "Private provision of a public good - social capital and solid waste management in Dhaka, Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2422, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:26:y:1993:i:4:p:65-76. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/mimelau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Wiley Content Delivery (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/mimelau.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.