IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Auditing the Producer Price Index: Micro Evidence from Prescription Pharamceutical Preparations

  • Berndt, Ernst R
  • Griliches, Zvi
  • Rosett, Joshua G

From January 1984 through December 1989, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) price index for prescription pharmaceuticals grew at 9.09 percent per year. Using BLS-type Laspeyres index procedures with monthly price and quantity data on all prescription pharmaceuticals sold by four U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturers accounting for 24 percent of industry domestic sales, we find that the four-company index increases at 6.68 percent per year. When we employ a Divisia price index with smoothed weights incorporating new goods, the index grows 6.03 percent per year. Why does the BLS index grow 50 percent more rapidly than the Divisia index? That mystery is the focal point of our article.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Article provided by American Statistical Association in its journal Journal of Business and Economic Statistics.

Volume (Year): 11 (1993)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 251-64

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:11:y:1993:i:3:p:251-64
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.amstat.org/publications/jbes/index.cfm?fuseaction=main

Order Information: Web: http://www.amstat.org/publications/index.html

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ernst R. Berndt & Zvi Griliches, 1990. "Price Indexes for Microcomputers: An Exploratory Study," NBER Working Papers 3378, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Hulten, Charles R, 1973. "Divisia Index Numbers," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(6), pages 1017-25, November.
  3. W. Erwin Diewert, 1988. "The Early History of Price Index Research," NBER Working Papers 2713, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ernst R. Berndt & Zvi Griliches & Joshua G. Rosett, 1990. "On the Accuracy of Producer Price Indexes for Pharmaceutical Preparations: An Audit Based on Detailed Firm-Specific Data," NBER Working Papers 3490, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:11:y:1993:i:3:p:251-64. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.