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Endogenous Growth, Efficiency Wages, and Persistent Unemployment

  • Martin Zagler

    ()

    (Department of Economics, WU Vienna, Vienna)

This paper establishes a theoretical relation between the level of unemployment and the economic rate of growth. In a model with a monopolistically competitive manufacturing sector and a competitive innovation sector, which both pay efficiency wages, the equilibrium unemployment rate ¨C the Nawru ¨C exhibits an unambiguously negative impact on the long-run growth performance, as it reduces the innovative capacity of the economy. Only if efficiency levels are different across sectors, a causal relation from the growth rate to the level of unemployment can be established, since less innovation shifts the burden to induce efficiency towards the manufacturing sector, thus fostering unemployment.

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File URL: http://www.bapress.ca/Journal-2/Endogenous%20Growth,%20Efficiency%20Wages,%20and%20Persistent%20Unemployment.pdf
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Article provided by Better Advances Press, Canada in its journal Review of Economics & Finance.

Volume (Year): 1 (2011)
Issue (Month): (April)
Pages: 34-42

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Handle: RePEc:bap:journl:110203
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  1. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
  2. Mankiw, N Gregory & Romer, David & Weil, David N, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-37, May.
  3. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 1991. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198284345, March.
  4. Wadhwani, S. & Wall, M., 1988. "The Effects Of Profit-Sharing On Employment, Wages, Stock Returns And Productivity: Evidence From Uk Micro-Data," Papers 311, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  5. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1994. "Growth and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 477-94, July.
  6. van Schaik, A.B.T.M. & de Groot, H.L.F., 1995. "Unemployment and endogenous growth," Discussion Paper 1995-75, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  7. Akerlof, George A & Yellen, Janet L, 1990. "The Fair Wage-Effort Hypothesis and Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(2), pages 255-83, May.
  8. Nickell, Stephen & Kong, Paul, 1992. "An investigation into the power of insiders in wage determination," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1573-1599, December.
  9. Shapiro, Carl & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1984. "Equilibrium Unemployment as a Worker Discipline Device," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 433-44, June.
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