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Econometric Analysis of Games with Multiple Equilibria

  • �ureo de Paula


    (Department of Economics, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom; Center for Microdata Methods and Practice (CeMMAP) and Institute for Fiscal Studies, London WC1E 7AE, United Kingdom)

This article reviews the recent literature on the econometric analysis of games in which multiple solutions are possible. Multiplicity does not necessarily preclude the estimation of a particular model (and, in certain cases, even improves its identification), but ignoring it can lead to misspecifications. The review starts with a general characterization of structural models that highlights how multiplicity affects the classical paradigm. Because the information structure is an important guide to identification and estimation strategies, I discuss games of complete and incomplete information separately. Although many of the techniques discussed here can be transported across different information environments, some are specific to particular models. Models of social interactions are also surveyed. I close with a brief discussion of postestimation issues and research prospects.

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Article provided by Annual Reviews in its journal Annual Review of Economics.

Volume (Year): 5 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (05)
Pages: 107-131

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Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:5:y:2013:p:107-131
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  1. Elie Tamer & Federico Ciliberto, 2004. "Market Structure and Multiple Equilibria in Airline Markets," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 517, Econometric Society.
  2. Ariel Pakes & Michael Ostrovsky & Steve Berry, 2004. "Simple Estimators for the Parameters of Discrete Dynamic Games (with Entry/Exit Examples)," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2036, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  3. Bo Honore & Aureo de Paula, 2008. "Interdependent Durations," PIER Working Paper Archive 08-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  4. Hahn, Jinyong & Moon, Hyungsik Roger, 2010. "Panel Data Models With Finite Number Of Multiple Equilibria," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(03), pages 863-881, June.
  5. Victor Aguirregabiria & Pedro Mira, 2004. "Sequential Estimation of Dynamic Discrete Games," Industrial Organization 0406006, EconWPA.
  6. repec:bla:restud:v:77:y:2010:i:3:p:1138-1163 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Aureo de Paula, 2004. "Inference in a Synchronization Game with Social Interactions," PIER Working Paper Archive 07-017, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 May 2007.
  8. Aureo de Paula & Xun Tang, 2010. "Inference of Signs of Interaction Effects in Simultaneous Games with Incomplete Information," PIER Working Paper Archive 10-010, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  9. Bajari, Patrick & Benkard, C. Lanier & Levin, Jonathan, 2007. "Estimating Dynamic Models of Imperfect Competition," Research Papers 1852r1, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  10. Kasy, Maximilian, . "Nonparametric inference on the number of equilibria," Working Paper 32847, Harvard University OpenScholar.
  11. Arie Beresteanu, 2009. "Sharp Identification Regions in Models with Convex Predictions: Games, Individual Choice, and Incomplete Data," Working Papers 428, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2010.
  12. Aradillas-Lopez, Andres & Tamer, Elie, 2008. "The Identification Power of Equilibrium in Simple Games," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 26, pages 261-310.
  13. Aradillas-Lopez, Andres, 2010. "Semiparametric estimation of a simultaneous game with incomplete information," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 157(2), pages 409-431, August.
  14. Andrea Moro, 2003. "The Effect Of Statistical Discrimination On Black-White Wage Inequality: Estimating A Model With Multiple Equilibria," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 467-500, 05.
  15. Ivana Komunjer & Federico Echenique, 2004. "Testing Models with Multiple Equilibria by Quantile Methods," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 447, Econometric Society.
  16. Brock, William A. & Durlauf, Steven N., 2007. "Identification of binary choice models with social interactions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 52-75, September.
  17. Alberto Bisin & Andrea Moro & Giorgio Topa, 2011. "The Empirical Content of Models with Multiple Equilibria in Economies with Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 17196, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. repec:oup:restud:v:78:y::i:4:p:1264-1298 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Todd, Petra E. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 2012. "Estimating a Coordination Game in the Classroom," Working Papers 14-017, Rice University, Department of Economics.
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