IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/jlaare/99109.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Aligning Incentives for Contract Dairy Heifer Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Olynk, Nicole J.
  • Wolf, Christopher A.

Abstract

As dairy farms grow and specialize in milking cows, raising replacement heifers is increasingly outsourced. Perhaps the largest challenge of outsourcing the heifer enterprise involves quality, measured as milk production potential, and the possibility for moral hazard due to hidden action on the part of the custom heifer grower. A principal-agent framework was used to elicit contract terms to provide incentives for the heifer grower to achieve desired growth rates, and enable the return of the heifer to the dairy farm on an accelerated time frame, without sacrificing quality. To mitigate incentive asymmetries, bonuses and deductions are proposed.

Suggested Citation

  • Olynk, Nicole J. & Wolf, Christopher A., 2010. "Aligning Incentives for Contract Dairy Heifer Growth," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(3), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:99109
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/99109
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Macho-Stadler, Ines & Perez-Castrillo, J. David, 2001. "An Introduction to the Economics of Information: Incentives and Contracts," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199243259.
    2. Resende-Filho, Moises & Buhr, Brian, 2006. "A Principal-Agent Model for Evaluating the Economic Value of a Beef Traceability System: A Case Study with Injection-site Lesions Control in Fed Cattle," MPRA Paper 467, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Moises A. Resende-Filho & Brian L. Buhr, 2008. "A Principal-Agent Model for Evaluating the Economic Value of a Traceability System: A Case Study with Injection-site Lesion Control in Fed Cattle," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1091-1102.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:99109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/waeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.