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Local Labor Market Conditions and the Jobless Poor: How Much Does Local Job Growth Help in Rural Areas?

  • Davis, Elizabeth E.
  • Connolly, Laura S.
  • Weber, Bruce A.

The employment outcomes of a group of jobless poor Oregonians are tracked in order to analyze the relative importance of local labor market conditions on their employment outcomes. Local job growth increases the probability that a jobless poor adult will get a job and shortens the length of time until she finds a job. After accounting for both the effects of personal demographic characteristics and local job growth, there is little evidence that the probability of employment or the duration of joblessness differs in rural compared with urban areas.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31060
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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2003)
Issue (Month): 03 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31060
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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  1. James Hines & Hilary Hoynes & Alan Krueger, 2001. "Another Look at Whether a Rising Tide Lifts All Boats," Working Papers 833, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. John Bound & Harry J. Holzer, 1996. "Demand Shifts, Population Adjustments, and Labor Market Outcomes during the 1980s," NBER Working Papers 5685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. John M. Fitzgerald, 1995. "Local labor markets and local area effects on welfare duration," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 43-67.
  4. Hilary Williamson Hoynes, 1999. "The Employment, Earnings, and Income of Less Skilled Workers Over the Business Cycle," JCPR Working Papers 85, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  5. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, December.
  6. Davis, Elizabeth E. & Weber, Bruce A., 2002. "How Much Does Local Job Growth Improve Employment Outcomes of the Rural Working Poor?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 32(2), pages 255-274, Summer/Fa.
  7. Bradford F. Mills, 2000. "Are Spells of Unemployment Longer in Nonmetropolitan Areas? Nonparametric and Semiparametric Evidence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 697-718.
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