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Economic and environmental implications of incorporating distillers’ dried grains with solubles in feed rations of growing and finishing swine in Argentina

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Listed:
  • De Matteis, Maria C.
  • Yu, T. Edward
  • Boyer, Christopher N.
  • DeLong, Karen L.
  • Smith, Jason

Abstract

The Argentinean swine industry has quickly expanded over the past decade, hence increasing the demand for swine feedstuffs. The growing supply of distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS) from the emerging Argentinean corn-based ethanol industry is a potential feedstuff for swine producers. Using a multi-objective linear programming model, this study examined the economic and environmental concerns (i.e. cost and phosphorus content) associated with introducing DDGS in swine feed rations. Results suggest that including DDGS in swine diets concurrently minimized cost and phosphorus content. The results were extrapolated to the entire Argentinean swine industry and show that the inclusion of DDGS in swine rations could potentially save the Argentinean swine industry about 19.21 million US dollars annually and reduce phosphorus content by up to 5%. In addition, sensitivity analysis of DDGS price was conducted and the potential demand for DDGS from swine by growth category was derived.

Suggested Citation

  • De Matteis, Maria C. & Yu, T. Edward & Boyer, Christopher N. & DeLong, Karen L. & Smith, Jason, 2018. "Economic and environmental implications of incorporating distillers’ dried grains with solubles in feed rations of growing and finishing swine in Argentina," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 21(6), July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:274995
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.274995
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/274995/files/ifamr2017.0073.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Schmit, Todd M. & Verteramo, Leslie & Tomek, William G., 2009. "Implications of Growing Biofuel Demands on Northeast Livestock Feed Costs," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(02), pages 200-212, October.
    2. Boland, Michael A. & Preckel, Paul V. & Foster, Kenneth A., 1998. "Economic Analysis Of Phosphorus - Reducing Technologies In Pork Production," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 23(2), pages 1-15, December.
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    4. Jacinto F. Fabiosa, 2008. "Distillers Dried Grain Product Innovation and Its Impact on Adoption, Inclusion, Substitution, and Displacement Rates in a Finishing Hog Ration," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 08-wp478, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
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    9. Frank J. Dooley, 2008. "U.S. Market Potential For Dried Distillers Grain With Solubles," Working Papers 08-12, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    10. Jacinto F. Fabiosa, 2008. "Distillers Dried Grain Product Innovation and Its Impact on Adoption, Inclusion, Substitution, and Displacement Rates in a Finishing Hog Ration," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications (archive only) 08-wp478, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
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