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Academic Perspectives on Agribusiness: An International Survey

Author

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  • Detre, Joshua D.
  • Gunderson, Michael A.
  • Oliver Peake, Whitney
  • Dooley, Frank J.

Abstract

Through an international survey of agricultural economists, we shed new light on perceptions about agribusiness education, research, grantsmanship, and outreach. Results indicate that de-partments expect agribusiness faculty to teach more courses, yet maintain research expecta-tions for agribusiness faculty similar to those of their non-agribusiness peers. As a result, agri-business faculty have lowered their engagement in agribusiness extension programs. Moreover, evidence suggests an increasing trend in the amount of grant dollars obtained and the number of refereed publications reported at the time of tenure evaluation, while the number of non-refereed publications has declined. Finally, results indicate that specialized journals, such as the IFAMR, have improved their importance as outlets for agribusiness research.

Suggested Citation

  • Detre, Joshua D. & Gunderson, Michael A. & Oliver Peake, Whitney & Dooley, Frank J., 2011. "Academic Perspectives on Agribusiness: An International Survey," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 0(Issue 5), pages 1-25, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:119979
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/119979/files/20110052_Formatted.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth F. Harling, 1995. "Differing perspectives on agribusiness management," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 501-511.
    2. Heiman, Amir & Miranowski, John A. & Zilberman, David & Alix-Garcia, Jennifer Marie, 2002. "The Increasing Role Of Agribusiness In Agricultural Economics," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-30.
    3. Kinnucan, Henry W. & Traxler, Greg, 1994. "Ranking Agricultural Economics Departments By Ajae Page Counts: A Reappraisal," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-6, October.
    4. Christiana E. Hilmer & Michael J. Hilmer, 2005. "How Do Journal Quality, Co-Authorship, and Author Order Affect Agricultural Economists' Salaries?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 509-523.
    5. Gregory M. Perry, 2010. "What is the Future of Agricultural Economics Departments and the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association?," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 117-134.
    6. Michael A. Boland & Jay T. Akridge, 2004. "Undergraduate Agribusiness Programs: Focus or Falter?," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 564-578.
    7. Connor, Larry J., 2005. "Design and Management of Teaching Programs With Survival In Mind," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(02), pages 489-497, August.
    8. Ng, Desmond W. & Siebert, John W., 2009. "Toward Better Defining the Field of Agribusiness Management," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 0(Issue 4), pages 1-20, November.
    9. Connor, Larry J., 2005. "Design and Management of Teaching Programs With Survival In Mind," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-9, August.
    10. Frank J. Dooley & Joan R. Fulton, 1999. "The State of Agribusiness Teaching, Research, and Extension at the Turn of the Millennium," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1042-1049.
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    Cited by:

    1. Petrolia, Daniel R. & Hudson, Darren, 2013. "Why Is the Journal of Agricultural & Applied Economics Not in the Major Citation Indices and Does It Really Matter?," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0, pages 1-8, August.
    2. Van Fleet, David D. & Hutt, Roger W., 2016. "Journal Lists: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 0(Issue 3), pages 1-20, August.

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