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Multifunctional Agriculture and Domestic/International Policy Choice

  • Blandford, David
  • Boisvert, Richard N.
Registered author(s):

    The concept of multifunctionality, in which agriculture is viewed as a source of both commodity and non-commodity outputs, has stimulated debate on the desirability of further trade liberalization. We explore the economics of multifunctionality and its policy implications. We argue for a new policy approach in which land and natural resource managers are remunerated for positive non-commodity outputs and penalized for negative outputs. This would require devolution in policy implementation from the centre to the local level. Such an approach would permit countries to achieve broader social objectives, while at the same time continuing to pursue trade liberalization.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23910
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    Article provided by Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade in its journal Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy.

    Volume (Year): 03 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:ecjilt:23910
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    1. Segerson, Kathleen, 1988. "Uncertainty and incentives for nonpoint pollution control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 87-98, March.
    2. Peterson, Jeffrey M. & Boisvert, Richard N., 2000. "Optimal Land Conversion At The Rural-Urban Fringe With Positive And Negative Agricultural Externalities," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21722, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. JunJie Wu & Bruce A. Babcock, 1995. "Optimal Design of a Voluntary Green Payment Program Under Asymmetric Information," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 95-wp131, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    4. Spulber, Daniel F., 1985. "Effluent regulation and long-run optimality," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 103-116, June.
    5. Peterson, Jeffrey M. & Boisvert, Richard N. & de Gorter, Harry, 1999. "Multifunctionality and Optimal Environmental Policies for Agriculture in an Open Economy," Working Papers 127701, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    6. Antle, John M. & Wagenet, Robert J., 1995. "Why Scientists Should Talk to Economists - and Vice Versa," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 10(4).
    7. John E. Floyd, 1965. "The Effects of Farm Price Supports on the Returns to Land and Labor in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 148.
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