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A Game Theoretic Analysis Of Turkish Accession To A European Customs Union

  • Kennedy, P. Lynn
  • Atici, Cemal
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    The entrance of additional countries into a European customs union, in this case Turkey, and its impact on agriculture are examined. Results from a trade simulation model are used as components of a Political Preference Function and utilized within a game theoretic framework to identify the optimal strategies for Turkey, the EU, and the U.S. Turkey's best interest, from an agricultural perspective, involves adoption of agreements made in the Uruguay round of GATT as a developing country rather than applying EU protection. Although free trade is not the optimal solution, simulations indicate that the solution does involve the reduction of agricultural protection levels.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31289
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    Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

    Volume (Year): 28 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 2 (October)
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:31289
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.narea.org/

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    1. Hillman, Arye L, 1982. "Declining Industries and Political-Support Protectionist Motives," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1180-87, December.
    2. Rausser, Gordon C & Freebairn, John W, 1974. "Estimation of Policy Preference Functions: An Application to U.S. Beef Import Quotas," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 56(4), pages 437-49, November.
    3. Bruce Gardner, 1981. "Efficient Redistribution in Agricultural Commodity Markets," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 20, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    4. Putnam, Robert D., 1988. "Diplomacy and domestic politics: the logic of two-level games," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(03), pages 427-460, June.
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