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Gender-based Segregation before and after the Great Recession


  • Stephan HUMPERT

    (Leuphana University Lueneburg, Germany)


Pooled international survey data is used to analyze occupational segregation in times of the great recession. Observing over 30 European economies and the United States over a time span of 10 years, I present evidence of a somehow surprising crisis effect on gender-based segregation. While all economies differ in their general magnitudes, the economic downturn affects a temporary reduction of segregation in terms of two dissimilarity measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan HUMPERT, 2015. "Gender-based Segregation before and after the Great Recession," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(4(605), W), pages 53-62, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:agr:journl:v:xxii:y:2015:i:4(605):p:53-62

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Humpert , Stephan, 2014. "Trends in occupational segregation: What happened with women and foreigners in Germany?," European Economic Letters, European Economics Letters Group, vol. 3(2), pages 36-39.
    2. Karmel, T & Maclachlan, M, 1988. "Occupational Sex Segregation--Increasing or Decreasing?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(186), pages 187-195, September.
    3. Schäfer, Andrea & Tucci, Ingrid & Gottschall, Karin, 2011. "Top down or bottom up? A cross-national study of vertical occupational sex segregation in twelve European Countries," Working papers of the ZeS 04/2011, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).
    4. SIERMINSKA Eva & TAKHTAMANOVA Yelena, 2010. "Job Flows, demographics and the Great Recession," LISER Working Paper Series 2010-41, LISER.
    5. Francine Blau & Peter Brummund & Albert Liu, 2013. "Trends in Occupational Segregation by Gender 1970–2009: Adjusting for the Impact of Changes in the Occupational Coding System," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 471-492, April.
    6. Martin Watts, 1998. "Occupational gender segregation: Index measureiient and econometric modeling," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(4), pages 489-496, November.
    7. Stephan Humpert, 2014. "Occupational Sex Segregation and Working Time: Regional Evidence from Germany," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(3), pages 317-329, June.
    8. Francine D. Blau & Wallace E. Hendricks, 1979. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(2), pages 197-210.
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    More about this item


    Gender Segregation; Duncan Index; Karmel-MacLachlan Index; European Social Survey (ESS); General Social Survey (GSS).;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity


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