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A Meta-Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Policy in the United States

Author

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  • Adam Rose
  • Noah Dormady

Abstract

This paper provides a meta-analysis of a broad set of recent studies of the economic impacts of climate change mitigation policies. It evaluates the influences of the impacts of causal factors, key economic assumptions and macroeconomic linkages on the outcome of these studies. A quantile regression analysis is also performed on the meta sample, to evaluate the robustness of those key factors throughout the full range of macro findings. Results of these analyses suggest that study results are strongly driven by data inputs, economic assumptions and modeling approaches. However, they are sometimes affected in counterintuitive ways.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam Rose & Noah Dormady, 2011. "A Meta-Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Policy in the United States," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 143-166.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2011v32-02-a06
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Johanna CHOUMERT & Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Charlain GUEGANG DJIMELI, 2017. "The biofuel-development nexus: A meta-analysis," Working Papers 201709, CERDI.
    2. Diaz Anadon, Laura & Bosetti, Valentina & Chan, Gabriel & Nemet, Gregory & Verdolini, Elena, 2014. "Energy Technology Expert Elicitations for Policy: Workshops, Modeling, and Meta-analysis," Working Paper Series rwp14-054, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Azreen Karim & Ilan Noy, 2016. "Poverty and Natural Disasters: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 7(2).
    4. Dan Wei and Adam Rose, 2014. "Macroeconomic Impacts of the California Global Warming Solutions Act on the Southern California Economy," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    5. Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Rive, Nathan A. & Mideksa, Torben K., 2012. "Europe’s climate goals and the electricity sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 200-211.
    6. Dormady, Noah C., 2014. "Carbon auctions, energy markets & market power: An experimental analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 468-482.
    7. Gregory F. Nemet & Laura Diaz Anadon & Elena Verdolini, 2016. "Quantifying the Effects of Expert Selection and Elicitation Design on Experts’ Confidence in their Judgments about Future Energy Technologies," Working Papers 2016.61, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    8. Adam Rose & Dan Wei & Noah Dormady, 2011. "Regional macroeconomic assessment of the Pennsylvania Climate Action Plan," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 357-379, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. Meta-Analysis in Economics

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