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Noah Dormady

Personal Details

First Name:Noah
Middle Name:
Last Name:Dormady
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdo358
http://noahdormady.com

Affiliation

John Glenn School of Public Affairs
Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio (United States)
http://glennschool.osu.edu/

:


RePEc:edi:sposuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Noah Dormady, 2016. "Carbon Auction Revenue and Market Power: An Experimental Analysis," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(11), pages 1-20, November.
  2. Dormady, Noah C., 2014. "Carbon auctions, energy markets & market power: An experimental analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 468-482.
  3. Dormady, Noah C., 2013. "Market power in cap-and-trade auctions: A Monte Carlo approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 788-797.
  4. Adam Rose & Noah Dormady, 2011. "A Meta-Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Policy in the United States," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 143-166.
  5. Adam Rose & Dan Wei & Noah Dormady, 2011. "Regional macroeconomic assessment of the Pennsylvania Climate Action Plan," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 357-379, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Dormady, Noah C., 2014. "Carbon auctions, energy markets & market power: An experimental analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 468-482.

    Cited by:

    1. Vera, Sonia & Sauma, Enzo, 2015. "Does a carbon tax make sense in countries with still a high potential for energy efficiency? Comparison between the reducing-emissions effects of carbon tax and energy efficiency measures in the Chile," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 478-488.
    2. Yu, Dejian & Xu, Chao, 2017. "Mapping research on carbon emissions trading: a co-citation analysis," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 1314-1322.
    3. Jory, Surendranath & Ngo, Thanh, 2017. "Firm power in product market and stock returns," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 182-193.
    4. Noah Dormady, 2016. "Carbon Auction Revenue and Market Power: An Experimental Analysis," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(11), pages 1-20, November.
    5. Tang, Ling & Wu, Jiaqian & Yu, Lean & Bao, Qin, 2015. "Carbon emissions trading scheme exploration in China: A multi-agent-based model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 152-169.
    6. Tang, Ling & Wu, Jiaqian & Yu, Lean & Bao, Qin, 2017. "Carbon allowance auction design of China's emissions trading scheme: A multi-agent-based approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 30-40.

  2. Dormady, Noah C., 2013. "Market power in cap-and-trade auctions: A Monte Carlo approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 788-797.

    Cited by:

    1. Dormady, Noah C., 2014. "Carbon auctions, energy markets & market power: An experimental analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 468-482.
    2. Bin Ye & Jingjing Jiang & Lixin Miao & Ji Li & Yang Peng, 2015. "Innovative Carbon Allowance Allocation Policy for the Shenzhen Emission Trading Scheme in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, December.
    3. Noah Dormady, 2016. "Carbon Auction Revenue and Market Power: An Experimental Analysis," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(11), pages 1-20, November.

  3. Adam Rose & Noah Dormady, 2011. "A Meta-Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Policy in the United States," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 143-166.

    Cited by:

    1. Diaz Anadon, Laura & Bosetti, Valentina & Chan, Gabriel & Nemet, Gregory & Verdolini, Elena, 2014. "Energy Technology Expert Elicitations for Policy: Workshops, Modeling, and Meta-analysis," Working Paper Series rwp14-054, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Johanna Choumert & Pascale Combes Motel & Charlain Guegang Djimeli, 2017. "The biofuel-development nexus: A meta-analysis," Working Papers halshs-01512678, HAL.
    3. Dormady, Noah C., 2014. "Carbon auctions, energy markets & market power: An experimental analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 468-482.
    4. Azreen Karim & Ilan Noy, 2016. "Poverty and Natural Disasters: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 7(2).
    5. Dan Wei and Adam Rose, 2014. "Macroeconomic Impacts of the California Global Warming Solutions Act on the Southern California Economy," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    6. Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Rive, Nathan A. & Mideksa, Torben K., 2012. "Europe’s climate goals and the electricity sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 200-211.
    7. Nemet, Gregory F. & Anadon, Laura Diaz & Verdolini, Elena, 2016. "Quantifying the Effects of Expert Selection and Elicitation Design on Experts’ Confidence in their Judgments about Future Energy Technologies," MITP: Mitigation, Innovation,and Transformation Pathways 249349, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).

  4. Adam Rose & Dan Wei & Noah Dormady, 2011. "Regional macroeconomic assessment of the Pennsylvania Climate Action Plan," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 357-379, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Adam Rose & Dan Wei & Fynnwin Prager, 2012. "Distributional Impacts Of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: Alternative Allocation And Recycling Strategies In California," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(4), pages 603-617, October.
    2. Nelson, Hal T. & Rose, Adam & Wei, Dan & Peterson, Thomas & Wennberg, Jeffrey, 2015. "Intergovernmental climate change mitigation policies: theory and outcomes," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 35(01), pages 97-136, April.
    3. Dan Wei and Adam Rose, 2014. "Macroeconomic Impacts of the California Global Warming Solutions Act on the Southern California Economy," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    4. Lawrence, Michael F. & Wei, Dan & Rose, Adam & Williamson, Scott & Cartwright-Smith, Devon, 2017. "Macroeconomic impacts of proposed climate change mitigation strategies for transportation in Southern California," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 56-69.
    5. Chen, Zhenhua & Rose, Adam Z. & Prager, Fynnwin & Chatterjee, Samrat, 2017. "Economic consequences of aviation system disruptions: A reduced-form computable general equilibrium analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 207-226.
    6. Wei, Dan & Brugués, Alejandro & Rose, Adam & de la Parra, Carlos A. & García, Rigoberto & Martínez, Federico, 2017. "Climate change and the economy in Baja California: Assessment of macroeconomic impacts of the State's Climate Action Plan," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 373-388.

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