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The Effects of Information on Residential Demand for Electricity


  • Isamu Matsukawa


This paper measures the effects of information on residential demand for electricity, using data from a Japanese experiment. In the experiment, households had a continuous-display, electricity use monitoring device installed at their residence. The monitor was designed so that each consumer could easily look at graphs and tables associated with the consumer s own usage of electricity at any time during the experiment. The panel data were used to estimate a random effects model of electricity and count data models of monitor usage. The results indicate that monitor usage contributed to energy conservation.

Suggested Citation

  • Isamu Matsukawa, 2004. "The Effects of Information on Residential Demand for Electricity," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2004v25-01-a01

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hyungna Oh & Asawari Moholkar & Stratford Douglas & Powsiri Klinkhachorn, 2006. "System Reliability and Price Responsiveness of Residential Loads," Working Papers 06-01 Classification-, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Lynham, John & Nitta, Kohei & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Tarui, Nori, 2016. "Why does real-time information reduce energy consumption?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 173-181.
    3. Mizobuchi, Kenichi & Takeuchi, Kenji, 2013. "The influences of financial and non-financial factors on energy-saving behaviour: A field experiment in Japan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 775-787.
    4. Krishnamurti, Tamar & Schwartz, Daniel & Davis, Alexander & Fischhoff, Baruch & de Bruin, Wändi Bruine & Lave, Lester & Wang, Jack, 2012. "Preparing for smart grid technologies: A behavioral decision research approach to understanding consumer expectations about smart meters," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 790-797.
    5. S. Gaudin, 2006. "Effect of price information on residential water demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 383-393.
    6. Kazutoshi Tsuda & Michinori Uwasu & Keishiro Hara & Yukari Fuchigami, 2017. "Approaches to induce behavioral changes with respect to electricity consumption," Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Springer;Association of Environmental Studies and Sciences, vol. 7(1), pages 30-38, March.
    7. Faruqui, Ahmad & Sergici, Sanem & Sharif, Ahmed, 2010. "The impact of informational feedback on energy consumption—A survey of the experimental evidence," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1598-1608.
    8. Strong Aaron & Goemans Chris, 2014. "Quantity Uncertainty and Demand: The Case of Water Smart Reader Ownership," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(3), pages 1-26, July.
    9. Isamu Matsukawa, 2005. "The Benefits of Information on the Efficient Usage of Consumer Durables," Others 0501005, EconWPA.
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:528-:d:94481 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kazutoshi Tsuda & Keishiro Hara & Michinori Uwasu, 2013. "Prospects and Challenges for Disseminating Life Cycle Thinking towards Environmental Conscious Behaviors in Daily Lives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 1-13, January.
    12. Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska & Katarzyna Maciejowska & Katarzyna Sznajd-Weron & Rafal Weron, 2013. "Going green: Agent-based modeling of the diffusion of dynamic electricity tariffs," HSC Research Reports HSC/13/05, Hugo Steinhaus Center, Wroclaw University of Technology.
    13. Schleich, Joachim & Klobasa, Marian & Gölz, Sebastian & Brunner, Marc, 2013. "Effects of feedback on residential electricity demand—Findings from a field trial in Austria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1097-1106.
    14. repec:aen:journl:ej38-6-pon is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Shiljkut, Vladimir M. & Rajakovic, Nikola Lj., 2015. "Demand response capacity estimation in various supply areas," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 92(P3), pages 476-486.
    16. Carsten Lynge Jensen, Lars Garn Hansen, Troels Fjordbak, and Erik Gudbjerg, 2012. "Providing Free Autopoweroff Plugs: Measuring the Effect on Households' Electricity Consumption through a Field Experiment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    17. Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2006. "Energy Conservation in the United States: Understanding its Role in Climate Policy," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0609, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    18. Schleich, Joachim & Klobasa, Marian & Brunner, Marc & Gölz, Sebastian & Götz, Konrad, 2011. "Smart metering in Germany and Austria: Results of providing feedback information in a field trial," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S6/2011, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    19. Grégoire Wallenborn & Catherine Rousseau & Karine Thollier, 2006. "Détermination de profils de ménages pour une utilisation plus rationnelle de l’energie," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/192217, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    20. Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2009. "The importance of comprehensiveness in renewable electricity and energy-efficiency policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1529-1541, April.
    21. repec:exl:22evid:v:2017:y:2017:i:1:p:- is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Carsten Lynge Jensen & Lars Gårn Hansen & Troels Fjordbak & Erik Gudbjerg, 2011. "The effect of providing free autopoweroff plugs to households on electricity consumption - A field experiment," IFRO Working Paper 2011/10, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    23. repec:eee:enepol:v:107:y:2017:i:c:p:225-233 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. DeCarolis, Joseph F. & Keith, David W., 2006. "The economics of large-scale wind power in a carbon constrained world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 395-410, March.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General


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