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Endogenous Treatment Effects for Count Data Models with Sample Selection or Endogenous Participation

  • Bratti, Massimiliano

    ()

    (University of Milan)

  • Miranda, Alfonso

    ()

    (CIDE, Mexico City)

In this paper we propose an estimator for models in which an endogenous dichotomous treatment affects a count outcome in the presence of either sample selection or endogenous participation using maximum simulated likelihood. We allow for the treatment to have an effect on both the sample selection or the participation rule and the main outcome. Applications of this model are frequent in – but are not limited to – health economics. We show an application of the model using data from Kenkel and Terza (2001), who investigate the effect of physician advice on the amount of alcohol consumption. Our estimates suggest that in these data (i) neglecting treatment endogeneity leads to a wrongly signed effect of physician advice on drinking intensity, (ii) neglecting endogenous participation leads to an upward biased estimate of the treatment effect of physician advice on drinking intensity.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5372.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5372
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  1. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  2. Joseph V. Terza & Donald S. Kenkel & Tsui-Fang Lin & Shinichi Sakata, 2008. "Care-giver advice as a preventive measure for drinking during pregnancy: zeros, categorical outcome responses, and endogeneity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 41-54.
  3. Alfonso Miranda Caso Luengo, 2003. "FIML estimation of an endogenous switching model for count data," United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2003 07, Stata Users Group.
  4. R. Winkelmann, 1998. "Count data models with selectivity," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 339-359.
  5. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  6. Mullahy, John, 1998. "Much ado about two: reconsidering retransformation and the two-part model in health econometrics," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 247-281, June.
  7. Adriaan S. Kalwij, 2000. "The effects of female employment status on the presence and number of children," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 221-239.
  8. Heckman, James J, 1978. "Dummy Endogenous Variables in a Simultaneous Equation System," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 931-59, July.
  9. Maria Melkersson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2000. "Modeling female fertility using inflated count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 189-203.
  10. Terza, Joseph V., 1998. "Estimating count data models with endogenous switching: Sample selection and endogenous treatment effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 129-154, May.
  11. William Greene, 2009. "Models for count data with endogenous participation," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 133-173, February.
  12. Frank Windmeijer & Joao Santos Silva, 1996. "Endogeneity in count data models; an application to demand for health care," IFS Working Papers W96/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  13. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  14. Donald S. Kenkel & Joseph V. Terza, 2001. "The effect of physician advice on alcohol consumption: count regression with an endogenous treatment effect," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 165-184.
  15. Mullahy, John, 1986. "Specification and testing of some modified count data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 341-365, December.
  16. Terza, Joseph V., 1985. "A Tobit-type estimator for the censored Poisson regression model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 361-365.
  17. Andreas Million & Regina T. Riphahn & Achim Wambach, 2003. "Incentive effects in the demand for health care: a bivariate panel count data estimation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 387-405.
  18. Alfonso Miranda & Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, 2006. "Maximum likelihood estimation of endogenous switching and sample selection models for binary, ordinal, and count variables," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(3), pages 285-308, September.
  19. Chamberlain, Gary, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 225-38, January.
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