Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Lecturing Style Teaching and Student Performance

Contents:

Author Info

  • Van Klaveren, C.

Abstract

Although there is a common believe that better teachers produce better students, there is no unambiguous scientific evidence that teacher characteristics are causally related to student performance. This raises the question whether the things that teachers do in class are more important than the characteristics they possess. In the Netherlands teachers tend to give less lectures in front of the class, and instead `choose' a more personal approach, because it is believed that this positively affects student performance. This study examines whether the percentage of time that teachers spend on lecturing in front of the class influences the performance of Dutch students. We find no empirical evidence that this percentage is positively or negatively related to the performance of students, and so, we do not find that a more personal approach affects student performance positively.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.tierweb.nl/assets/files/UM/Lecturing_styles_TIER_working_paper(1).pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research in its series Working Papers with number 29.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 00 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:29

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tierweb.nl

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Joseph G. Altonji & Todd E. Elder & Christopher R. Taber, 2005. "Selection on Observed and Unobserved Variables: Assessing the Effectiveness of Catholic Schools," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 151-184, February.
  2. Aslam, Monazza & Kingdon, Geeta, 2011. "What can teachers do to raise pupil achievement?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 559-574, June.
  3. Kan, Kamhon & Tsai, Wei-Der, 2005. "Parenting practices and children's education outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 29-43, February.
  4. Guido Schwerdt & Amelie C. Wuppermann, 2009. "Is Traditional Teaching really all that Bad? A Within-Student Between-Subject Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 2634, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Hanushek, Eric A. & Rivkin, Steven G., 2006. "Teacher Quality," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  6. Helena Holmlund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Parents' Schooling on Children's Schooling: A Comparison of Estimation Methods," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 615-51, September.
  7. Daniel Aaronson & Lisa Barrow & William Sander, 2002. "Teachers and student achievement in the Chicago public high schools," Working Paper Series WP-02-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  8. Kukla-Acevedo, Sharon, 2009. "Do teacher characteristics matter? New results on the effects of teacher preparation on student achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 49-57, February.
  9. Caroline Hoxby, 2000. "Peer Effects in the Classroom: Learning from Gender and Race Variation," NBER Working Papers 7867, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Edward P. Lazear, 2001. "Educational Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(3), pages 777-803, August.
  11. Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2007. "Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects," NBER Working Papers 13617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. John G. Cragg, 1994. "Making Good Inferences from Bad Data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 776-800, November.
  13. Daouli, Joan & Demoussis, Michael & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2010. "Mothers, fathers and daughters: Intergenerational transmission of education in Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 83-93, February.
  14. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, 03.
  15. Clotfelter, Charles T. & Ladd, Helen F. & Vigdor, Jacob L., 2007. "Teacher credentials and student achievement: Longitudinal analysis with student fixed effects," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 673-682, December.
  16. Sharkey, Nancy S. & Goldhaber, Dan, 2008. "Teacher licensure status and student achievement: Lessons from private schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 504-516, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Trinh Le, 2013. "Does Participation in Extracurricular Activities Reduce Engagement in Risky Behaviours?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n35, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Andrey Zakharov & Martin Carnoy & Prashant Loyalka, 2013. "Which teaching practices improve student performance on high-stakes exams? Evidence from Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 13/EDU/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  3. Meyer, Erik & Van Klaveren, Chris, 2013. "The effectiveness of extended day programs: Evidence from a randomized field experiment in the Netherlands," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-11.
  4. De Witte, K. & Van Klaveren, C., 2010. "How are Teachers Teaching? A Nonparametric Approach," Working Papers 36, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  5. Tatiana Khavenson & Yulia Tyumeneva, 2012. "Teacher Characteristics and Student Achievements in TIMSS. Findings Gained from Applying the "First-Difference" Method to TIMSS-2007 Data," HSE Working papers WP BRP 06/EDU/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  6. Coenen, J. & Van Klaveren, C., 2013. "Better test scores with a same-gender teacher?," Working Papers 47, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jessica Segal) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Jessica Segal to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.