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Is traditional teaching really all that bad? A within-student between-subject approach

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  • Schwerdt, Guido
  • Wuppermann, Amelie C.

Abstract

Recent studies conclude that teachers are important for student learning but it remains uncertain what actually determines effective teaching. This study directly peers into the black box of educational production by investigating the relationship between lecture style teaching and student achievement. Based on matched student-teacher data for the US, the estimation strategy exploits between-subject variation to control for unobserved student traits. Results indicate that traditional lecture style teaching is associated with significantly higher student achievement. No support for detrimental effects of lecture style teaching can be found even when evaluating possible selection biases due to unobservable teacher characteristics.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 365-379

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:30:y:2011:i:2:p:365-379

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

Related research

Keywords: Teaching practices Educational production TIMSS Between-subject variation;

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References

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  1. Abhijit Banerjee & Shawn Cole & Esther Duflo & Leigh Linden, 2005. "Remedying Education: Evidence from Two Randomized Experiments in India," NBER Working Papers 11904, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. Thomas S. Dee, 2005. "Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 11660, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Joseph G. Altonji & Todd E. Elder & Christopher R. Taber, 2005. "Selection on Observed and Unobserved Variables: Assessing the Effectiveness of Catholic Schools," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 151-184, February.
  10. Thomas S. Dee, 2005. "A Teacher Like Me: Does Race, Ethnicity, or Gender Matter?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 158-165, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Prashant Loyalka & Andrey Zakharov, 2014. "Does shadow education help students prepare for college?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 15/EDU/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  2. Martin Schlotter & Guido Schwerdt & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Econometric methods for causal evaluation of education policies and practices: a non-technical guide," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 109-137.
  3. Gerald Eisenkopf & Pascal Sulser, 2013. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments improve Economic Education in High Schools?," TWI Research Paper Series 80, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
  4. Metzler, Johannes & Woessmann, Ludger, 2010. "The Impact of Teacher Subject Knowledge on Student Achievement: Evidence from Within-Teacher Within-Student Variation," IZA Discussion Papers 4999, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. De Witte, K. & Van Klaveren, C., 2010. "How are Teachers Teaching? A Nonparametric Approach," Working Papers 36, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  6. Van Klaveren, Chris, 2011. "Lecturing style teaching and student performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 729-739, August.
  7. Torberg Falch & Marte Rønning, 2011. "Homework assignment and student achievement in OECD countries," Working Paper Series 11411, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  8. Michael Funke & Marc Gronwald, 2009. "A Convex Hull Approach to Counterfactual Analysis of Trade Openness and Growth," Quantitative Macroeconomics Working Papers 20906, Hamburg University, Department of Economics.
  9. Trinh Le, 2013. "Does Participation in Extracurricular Activities Reduce Engagement in Risky Behaviours?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n35, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  10. Antonello E. Scorcu & Laura Vici, 2013. "Economic and cultural factors and illegal copying in the university textbook market," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2013, the Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Feb 2013.
  11. Barb Bloemhof & John Livernois, 2011. "Making Large Classes Small(er): Assessing the Effectiveness Of a Hybrid Teaching Technology," Working Papers 1111, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  12. Andrey Zakharov & Martin Carnoy & Prashant Loyalka, 2013. "Which teaching practices improve student performance on high-stakes exams? Evidence from Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 13/EDU/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

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