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Job Market Signaling and Employer Learning

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  • Alós-Ferrer, Carlos

    ()
    (University of Konstanz)

  • Prat, Julien

    ()
    (CREST)

Abstract

This paper extends the job market signaling model of Spence (1973) by allowing firms to learn the ability of their employees over time. Contrary to the model without employer learning, we find that the Intuitive Criterion does not always select a unique separating equilibrium. When the Intuitive Criterion bites and information is purely asymmetric, the separating level of education does not depend on the observability of workers’ types. On the other hand, when workers are also uncertain about their productivity, the separating level of education is ambiguously related to the speed of employer learning.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3285.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published online in: Journal of Economic Theory, 2012, [In Press / Corrected Proof]
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3285

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Keywords: education; job markets; signaling; intuitive criterion; employer learning;

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References

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  1. Banks, Jeffrey S & Sobel, Joel, 1987. "Equilibrium Selection in Signaling Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(3), pages 647-61, May.
  2. Araújo, Aloísio Pessoa de & Moreira, Humberto Ataíde, 2000. "Adverse Selection Problems Without the Spence-Mirrlees Condition," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 389, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
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  6. Péter Eső & James Schummer, 2009. "Credible deviations from signaling equilibria," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 411-430, November.
  7. Robert Gibbons & Lawrence F. Katz & Thomas Lemieux & Daniel Parent, 2002. "Comparative Advantage, Learning, and Sectoral Wage Determination," NBER Working Papers 8889, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  10. Carlos Alós-Ferrer & Klaus Ritzberger, 2005. "Trees and Extensive Forms," Vienna Economics Papers 0506, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
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  13. Habermalz, Steffen, 2006. "The Speed of Employer Learning and Job Market Signaling Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 2309, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  17. Mailath George J. & Okuno-Fujiwara Masahiro & Postlewaite Andrew, 1993. "Belief-Based Refinements in Signalling Games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 241-276, August.
  18. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
  19. Lange, Fabian & Topel, Robert, 2006. "The Social Value of Education and Human Capital," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  20. Heski Bar-Isaac, 2003. "Reputation and Survival: Learning in a Dynamic Signalling Model," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(2), pages 231-251, 04.
  21. Fabian Lange, 2007. "The Speed of Employer Learning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 1-35.
  22. Spence, A Michael, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-74, August.
  23. Mark Voorneveld & Jörgen W. Weibull, 2011. "A Scent of Lemon—Seller Meets Buyer with a Noisy Quality Observation," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(1), pages 163-186, March.
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  25. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1977. "Education and Screening," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 949-58, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lu�s Santos-Pinto, 2012. "Labor Market Signaling and Self-Confidence: Wage Compression and the Gender Pay Gap," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(4), pages 873 - 914.
  2. Berliant, Marcus & Yu, Chia-Ming, 2012. "Locational signaling and agglomeration," MPRA Paper 41838, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2011. "Acquired Skills and Learned Abilities: Wage Dynamics in Internal Labor Markets," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f153, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 13 Apr 2014.
  4. Andrew Atkeson & Christian Hellwig & Guillermo Ordonez, 2012. "Optimal Regulation in the Presence of Reputation Concerns," NBER Working Papers 17898, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Mark Voorneveld & Jörgen W. Weibull, 2011. "A Scent of Lemon—Seller Meets Buyer with a Noisy Quality Observation," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(1), pages 163-186, March.

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