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Testing Models of Distributive Politics using Exit Polls to Measure Voters Preferences and Partisanship

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  • Valentino Larcinese

    (LSE)

  • James M. Snyder

    (MIT)

  • Cecilia Testa

    (University of London)

Abstract

This paper tests various hypotheses about distributive politics by studying the distribution of federal spending across U.S. states over the period 1978-2002. We improve on previous work by using survey data to measure the share of voters in each state that are Democrats, Republicans, and independents, or liberals, conservatives and moderates. We find no evidence that the allocation of federal spending to the states is distorted by strategic manipulation to win electoral support. States with many swing voters are not advantaged compared to states with more loyal voters, nor do “battleground states” attract more federal funds. Moreover, we find that spending has little or no effect on voters’ choices, whereas partisanship and ideology have massive effects.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano in its series Development Working Papers with number 278.

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Length: 41
Date of creation: 17 Nov 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:278

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Keywords: Ideological attitudes; partisanship; distributive politics; federal budget;

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  1. Alessandro Lizzeri & Nicola Persico, . ""The Provision of Public Goods Under Alternative Electoral Incentives''," CARESS Working Papres 98-08, University of Pennsylvania Center for Analytic Research and Economics in the Social Sciences.
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Cited by:
  1. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Marcelin Joanis, 2009. "The Road to Power: Partisan Loyalty and the Centralized Provision of Local Infrastructure," CIRANO Working Papers 2009s-46, CIRANO.
  3. Casey, Katherine, 2012. "Crossing Party Lines: The Effects of Information on Redistributive Politics," Research Papers 2099, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  4. Niklas Potrafke, 2011. "Economic Freedom and Government Ideology Across the German States," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2011-41, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.

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