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Distributive Politics in a Strong Party System: Evidence from Canadian Job Grant Programs

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  • Eric Crampton

    (George Mason University)

Abstract

The distributive politics literature following Weingast (1979) predicts majoritarian redistribution within countries governed by strong party systems. This prediction is tested using evidence from Canadian job creation grant programs active during the mid-1990s. Results provide strong evidence against the hypothesis of majoritarian redistribution. Districts represented by the governing Liberal Party received lower grant allocations than did other districts, both absolutely and conditional on the unemployment variables on which allocation decisions were to have been made.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/mic/papers/0211/0211001.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Microeconomics with number 0211001.

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Date of creation: 02 Nov 2002
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0211001

Note: Type of Document - PDF. This paper is under submission at Public Choice. I welcome comments and suggestions for improvement.
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: majoritarian redistribution; distributive politics; public choice; Canada; HRDC; CJF; TJF;

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References

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  1. Steven D. Levitt & James M. Snyder, Jr., 1995. "The Impact of Federal Spending on House Election Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 5002, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Longley, Neil, 1998. " Legislative Systems with Absolute Party Discipline: Implications for the Agency Theory Approach to the Constituent-Legislator Link," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(1-2), pages 121-40, October.
  3. Neil Longley, 1999. "Voting on Abortion in the House of Commons: A Test for Legislator Shirking," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(4), pages 503-521, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Andrew Leigh, 2008. "Bringing home the bacon: an empirical analysis of the extent and effects of pork-barreling in Australian politics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 137(1), pages 279-299, October.
  2. Valentino Larcinese & James M. Snyder & Cecilia Testa, 2009. "Testing Models of Distributive Politics using Exit Polls to Measure Voters Preferences and Partisanship," Development Working Papers 278, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  3. Kevin Milligan & Michael Smart, 2005. "Regional Grants as Pork Barrel Politics," CESifo Working Paper Series 1453, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Valentino Larcinese & James M. Snyder, Jr. & Cecilia Testa, 2006. "Testing Models Of Distributive Politicsusing Exit Polls To Measure Voterpreferences And Partisanship," STICERD - Political Economy and Public Policy Paper Series 19, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

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