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On the Trend Recognition and Forecasting Ability of Professional Traders

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  • Glaser, Markus
  • Langer, Thomas
  • Weber, Martin
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    Abstract

    Empirical research documents that temporary trends in stock price movements exist. Moreover, riding a trend can be a profitable investment strategy. Thus, the ability to recognize trends in stock markets influences the quality of investment decisions. In this Paper, we provide a thorough test of the trend recognition and forecasting ability of financial professionals who work in the trading room of a large bank and novices (MBA students). In an experimental study, we analyse two ways of trend prediction: probability estimates and confidence intervals. Subjects observe stock price charts, which are artificially generated by either a process with positive or negative trend and are asked to provide subjective probability estimates for the trend. In addition, the subjects were asked to state confidence intervals for the development of the chart in the future. We find that depending on the type of task either underconfidence (in probability estimates) or overconfidence (in confidence intervals) can be observed in the same trend prediction setting based on the same information. Underconfidence in probability estimates is more pronounced the longer the price history observed by subjects and the higher the discriminability of the price path generating processes. Furthermore, we find that the degree of overconfidence in both tasks is significantly positively correlated for all experimental subjects whereas performance measures are not. Our study has important implications for financial modelling. We argue that the question which psychological bias should be incorporated into a model does not depend on a specific informational setting but solely on the specific task considered. This Paper demonstrates that a theorist has to be careful when deriving assumptions about the behaviour of agents in financial markets from psychological findings.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3904.

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    Date of creation: May 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3904

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    Related research

    Keywords: conservatism; financial modelling; forecasting; overconfidence; professionals; trend recognition;

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    References

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    17. Hellwig, Martin F., 1980. "On the aggregation of information in competitive markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 477-498, June.
    18. Markus Glaser & Martin Weber, 2003. "Momentum and Turnover: Evidence from the German Stock Market," Schmalenbach Business Review (sbr), LMU Munich School of Management, vol. 55(2), pages 108-135, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Enrique Fatás & Tibor Neugebauer & Pilar Tamborero, 2004. "How Politicians Make Decisions: A Political Choice Experiment," IESA Working Papers Series 0410, Institute for Social Syudies of Andalusia - Higher Council for Scientific Research.
    2. Kourtidis, Dimitrios & Šević, Željko & Chatzoglou, Prodromos, 2011. "Investors’ trading activity: A behavioural perspective and empirical results," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 548-557.
    3. Stefan Ruenzi, 2005. "Mutual Fund Growth in Standard and Specialist Market Segments," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 153-167, August.
    4. Brozynski, Torsten & Menkhoff, Lukas & Schmidt, Ulrich, 2004. "The Impact of Experience on Risk Taking, Overconfidence, and Herding of Fund Managers: Complementary Survey Evidence," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-292, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    5. Fong, Wai Mun & Yong, Lawrence H. M., 2005. "Chasing trends: recursive moving average trading rules and internet stocks," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 43-76, January.

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