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Residential mobility and social capital

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  • Kan, Kamhon

Abstract

This paper empirically investigates the role of social capital in households’residential mobility behavior by considering its spatial dimension. This study focuses on a household’s social ties with people living nearby, which we refer to as its “local social capital”. Local social capital may deter residential mobility, because the resources stemming from them are location-specific and will be less valuable if a household moves. We conjecture that a household’s possession of local social capital has a negative effect on its residential mobility, and this negative effect of local social capital may be stronger on long-distance mobility than on short-distance mobility. Our empirical investigation is based on data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. We obtain evidence which is supportive of these conjectures.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 61 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 436-457

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:61:y:2007:i:3:p:436-457

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

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