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Citations for "Labor Market Responses to Rising Health Insurance Costs: Evidence on Hours Worked"

by David M. Cutler & Brigitte C. Madrian

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  1. Kanika Kapur & José J. Escarce & M Susan Marquis & Kosali I. Simon, 2008. "Where Do The Sick Go? Health Insurance and Employment in Small and Large Firms," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 644-664, January.
  2. Kanika Kapur & Pinar Karaca-Mandic & Susan M. Gates & Brent Fulton, 2006. "Do small group health insurance regulations influence small business size?," Working Papers 200622, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  3. Robert Dixon & John Freebairn, 2007. "Hours of Work: A Demand Perspective," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1022, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Katherine Baicker & Amitabh Chandra, 2005. "The Labor Market Effects of Rising Health Insurance Premiums," NBER Working Papers 11160, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Barkume, Anthony J., 2007. "Some New Evidence on Overtime Use, Total Job Compensation, and Wage Rates," Working Papers 402, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  6. Jonathan T. Kolstad & Amanda E. Kowalski, 2012. "Mandate-Based Health Reform and the Labor Market: Evidence from the Massachusetts Reform," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1855, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  7. Kanika Kapur & José J. Escarce & M. Susan Marquis & Kosali I. Simon, 2005. "Where do the sick go? Health insurance and employment in small and large firms," Open Access publications 10197/259, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  8. Joanna N. Lahey, 2011. "The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit Revisited: The Effect of Infertility Mandates," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 11-175, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  9. Stephen DeLoach & Jennifer Platania, 2013. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Financing Health Insurance," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 19(2), pages 107-129, May.
  10. Sang-Hyop Lee & Gerard Russo & Lawrence H. Nitz & Abdul Jabbar, 2005. "The Effect of Mandatory Employer-Sponsored Insurance (ESI) on Health Insurance Coverage and Labor Force Utilization in Hawaii: Evidence from the Current Population Survey (CPS) 1994-2004," Working Papers 200512, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  11. Brigitte Madrian, 2006. "The U.S. Health Care System and Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 11980, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Laura Bucila, 2008. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and the Minimum Wage," Working Papers 0812, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  13. DeVaro, Jed & Maxwell, Nan L., 2014. "The elusive wage-benefit trade-off: The case of employer-provided health insurance," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 23-37.
  14. Paige Qin & Michael Chernew, 2013. "Compensating Wage Differentials and the Impact of Health Insurance in the Public Sector on Wages and Hours," NBER Chapters, in: State and Local Health Plans for Active and Retired Public Employees National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Bailey, James & Webber, Douglas A., 2015. "Health Insurance Benefit Mandates and the Firm-Size Distribution," IZA Discussion Papers 9292, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Peter Kuhn & Fernando Lozano, 2008. "The Expanding Workweek? Understanding Trends in Long Work Hours among U.S. Men, 1979-2006," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 311-343, 04.
  17. Jennifer Feenstra Schultz & David Doorn, 2009. "Employer Health Benefit Costs and Demand for Part-Time Labor," Working Papers 09-08, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  18. Brigitte C. Madrian & Lars John Lefgren, 1999. "A Note on Longitudinally Matching Current Population Survey (CPS) Respondents," NBER Technical Working Papers 0247, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. A. M. Wolaver & T. D. McBride & B. L. Wolfe, . "Decreasing Opportunities for Low-Wage Workers: The Role of the Nondiscrimination Law for Employer-Provided Health Insurance," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1124-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  20. Velamuri, Malathi, 2009. "Taxes, Health Insurance and Women's Self-Employment," MPRA Paper 50474, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2012.
  21. repec:kap:iaecre:v:19:y:2013:i:2:p:107-129 is not listed on IDEAS
  22. Meyer, Rebecca & Orazem, Peter & Wachenheim, William A., 2002. "Labor Market Implications of Rising Costs of Employer-Provided Health Insurance," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10016, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  23. David J. Vanness, 2003. "A structural econometric model of family valuation and choice of employer-sponsored health insurance in the United States," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(9), pages 771-790.
  24. William R. Johnson, 2011. "Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 775-799.
  25. Carrie H. Colla & William H. Dow & Arindrajit Dube, 2011. "The Labor Market Impact of Employer Health Benefit Mandates: Evidence from San Francisco's Health Care Security Ordinance," NBER Working Papers 17198, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Qin, Paige & Chernew, Michael, 2014. "Compensating wage differentials and the impact of health insurance in the public sector on wages and hours," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 77-87.
  27. Jonathan Gruber, 1998. "Health Insurance and the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 6762, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  28. Katherine Baicker & Amitabh Chandra, 2005. "The Consequences of the Growth of Health Insurance Premiums," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 214-218, May.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.