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Labor Market Implications of Rising Costs of Employer-Provided Health Insurance

  • Meyer, Rebecca
  • Orazem, Peter
  • Wachenheim, William A.

Variation in income tax policies and health insurance costs are shown to be theoretically appropriate instruments to identify endogenous firm wage and benefit offers in a labor supply model. Empirical results show that firms are more likely to provide health insurance benefits in states with high marginal income tax rates and low hospitalization costs. The model implies that over the 1983-1995 period, large increases in health insurance costs and reductions in marginal income tax rates lowered the probability of receiving health insurance benefits from employers by 10 percentage points. This decrease in benefits lowered hours of labor supply by 4-7%.

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File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/publications/papers/p3808-2002-04-02.pdf
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Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 10016.

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Date of creation: 02 Apr 2002
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Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10016
Contact details of provider: Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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  1. Janet Currie & Aaron Yelowitz, 1999. "Health Insurance and Less Skilled Workers," NBER Working Papers 7291, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Janet Currie & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Health, Health Insurance and the Labor Market," JCPR Working Papers 27, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  3. Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black & Frank A. Scott, 1998. "How Well Do We Measure Employer-Provided Health Insurance Coverage?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(3), pages 356-367, 07.
  4. Dranove, David & Spier, Kathryn E. & Baker, Laurence, 2000. "'Competition' among employers offering health insurance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 121-140, January.
  5. Edward Montgomery & Kathryn Shaw, 1992. "Pensions and Wage Premia," NBER Working Papers 3985, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
  7. David M. Cutler & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Labor Market Responses to Rising Health Insurance Costs: Evidence on Hours Worked," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 29(3), pages 509-530, Autumn.
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