IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v31y1999i5p551-563.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Fringe benefits and the demand for part-time workers

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas Buchmueller

Abstract

In the US, tax code nondiscrimination rules and other institutional constraints require employers to offer the same fringe benefits to all full-time workers, but allow them to deny benefits to part-time workers. As a result, firms that offer generous fringe benefits to higher skill workers have an incentive to hire lower skill workers on a part-time or contingent basis. This paper uses cross-section establishment data to investigate the effect of employer-provided fringe benefits on the demand for part-time workers. The results indicate that firms that offer more generous fringe benefits make greater use of low wage part-time workers; there is no significant relationship between fringe benefits and the proportion of high wage workers employed part-time.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Buchmueller, 1999. "Fringe benefits and the demand for part-time workers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(5), pages 551-563.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:5:p:551-563
    DOI: 10.1080/000368499324002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368499324002
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Bound & David A. Jaeger & Regina Baker, 1993. "The Cure Can Be Worse than the Disease: A Cautionary Tale Regarding Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0137, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alan B. Krueger & Helen Levy, 1996. "Accounting for the Slowdown in Employer Health Care Costs," Working Papers 749, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    3. William M. Gentry & Eric Peress, 1994. "Taxes and Fringe Benefits Offered by Employers," NBER Working Papers 4764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. David M. Cutler & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Labor Market Responses to Rising Health Insurance Costs: Evidence on Hours Worked," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 29(3), pages 509-530, Autumn.
    5. repec:fth:prinin:370 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Alan Krueger & Helen Levy, 1996. "Accounting for the Slowdown in Employer Health Care Costs," Working Papers 749, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Dolfin, 2006. "An examination of firms' employment costs," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 861-878.
    2. Françoise Delmez & Vincent Vandenberghe, 2017. "Working long hours: less productive but less costly? Firm-level evidence from Belgium," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2017022, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    3. Paige Qin & Michael Chernew, 2013. "Compensating Wage Differentials and the Impact of Health Insurance in the Public Sector on Wages and Hours," NBER Chapters,in: State and Local Health Plans for Active and Retired Public Employees National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Qin, Paige & Chernew, Michael, 2014. "Compensating wage differentials and the impact of health insurance in the public sector on wages and hours," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 77-87.
    5. Jennifer Feenstra Schultz & David Doorn, 2009. "Employer Health Benefit Costs and Demand for Part-Time Labor," Working Papers 09-08, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    6. Rob Euwals & Maurice Hogerbrugge, 2004. "Explaining the growth of part-time employment; factors of supply and demand," CPB Discussion Paper 31, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    7. Juan R. Cuadrado Roura & Carlos Iglesias Fernández & Raquel Llorente Heras, 2007. "Regional differences in women´s part time employment. An analysis of supply and demand," Working Papers 03/07, Instituto Universitario de Análisis Económico y Social.
    8. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," CEPR Discussion Papers 5595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2004. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," IZA Discussion Papers 1124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Sang-Hyop Lee & Gerard Russo & Lawrence H. Nitz & Abdul Jabbar, 2005. "The Effect of Mandatory Employer-Sponsored Insurance (ESI) on Health Insurance Coverage and Labor Force Utilization in Hawaii: Evidence from the Current Population Survey (CPS) 1994-2004," Working Papers 200512, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    11. C. J. Krizan & Adela Luque & Alice Zawacki, 2014. "The Effect Of Employer Health Insurance Offering On The Growth And Survival Of Small Business Prior To The Affordable Care Act," Working Papers 14-22, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:5:p:551-563. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.