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Applying for jobs: Does ALMP participation help?

Author

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  • Rafael Lalive
  • Michael Morlok
  • Josef Zweimüller

Abstract

This paper calculates the impact of Active Labour Market Programmes through the use of three new indicators measuring the application performance of the unemployed. These indicators can be measured repeatedly and therefore allow the usage of Panel Regression methods, cancelling out any unobserved individual heterogeneity. To implement the new approach, data on 30,000 applications has been collected. Using this data, a large positive effect for unemployed with a long term unemployment forecast was estimated. For unemployed without such a forecast, the effect is much smaller. The paper also shows that the new evaluation approach fulfils the requirements of a good controlling instrument: It is accurate, detailed, non-intrusive, inexpensive and therefore easy to keep up to date, easy to understand and communicate.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafael Lalive & Michael Morlok & Josef Zweimüller, 2011. "Applying for jobs: Does ALMP participation help?," ECON - Working Papers 019, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:019
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    File URL: http://www.econ.uzh.ch/static/wp/econwp019.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerard J. van den Berg & Annette H. Bergemann & Marco Caliendo, 2009. "The Effect of Active Labor Market Programs on Not-Yet Treated Unemployed Individuals," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 606-616, 04-05.
    2. Oberholzer-Gee, Felix, 2008. "Nonemployment stigma as rational herding: A field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 30-40, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Evaluation; treatment effect; active labour market program; job search;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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