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A Bayesian approach to determine the impact of institutions on the unemployment rate

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  • Sachs, Andreas

Abstract

Labor and product market regulations affect the unemployment rate of a country without doubt. Econometricians, however, have yet to establish an unequivocal significance of this impact. Model mis-specification, one of the main underlying problems, is overcome by adopting a Bayesian Model Averaging approach. I apply this method to a panel data set that covers 17 OECD countries for the time period from 1982 to 2005 and for up to 20 potential explanatory variables. 8 institutional indicators are identified as significant determinants of unemployment. Endogeneity due to reverse causality is also considered by applying an instrumental variable estimation approach.

Suggested Citation

  • Sachs, Andreas, 2010. "A Bayesian approach to determine the impact of institutions on the unemployment rate," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-058, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:10058
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    Cited by:

    1. Sachs Andreas & Smolny Werner, 2015. "Youth Unemployment in the OECD: The Role of Institutions," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 403-417, August.
    2. Friedrich Schneider & Stefan Haigner & Stefan Jenewein & Florian Wakolbinger, 2014. "Institutions of conflict management and economic growth revisited: a short note," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 577-587, August.
    3. Sachs, Andreas, 2011. "Institutions and unemployment: Do interactions matter?," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-057, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; institutions; labor and product markets; model averaging;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E02 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Institutions and the Macroeconomy
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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