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Institutions of conflict management and economic growth revisited: a short note

Author

Listed:
  • Friedrich Schneider

    ()

  • Stefan Haigner

    ()

  • Stefan Jenewein

    ()

  • Florian Wakolbinger

    ()

Abstract

We study the effects of institutions of conflict management like corporatism, trust, civic norms and group membership on economic growth. By employing Schneider and Wagner’s (Kyklos 54:509–532, 2001 ) model and data from 1990–2011, we show that corporatism has (still) a positive coordination effect and a negative rent-seeking effect. The total effect is positive for most countries. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Friedrich Schneider & Stefan Haigner & Stefan Jenewein & Florian Wakolbinger, 2014. "Institutions of conflict management and economic growth revisited: a short note," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 577-587, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:41:y:2014:i:3:p:577-587
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-014-9255-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sachs, Andreas, 2010. "A Bayesian approach to determine the impact of institutions on the unemployment rate," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-058, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Amable, Bruno & Demmou, Lilas & Gatti, Donatella, 2007. "Employment Performance and Institutions: New Answers to an Old Question," IZA Discussion Papers 2731, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Rodrik, Dani, 1999. "Where Did All the Growth Go? External Shocks, Social Conflict, and Growth Collapses," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 385-412, December.
    4. Easterly, William, 2001. "Can Institutions Resolve Ethnic Conflict?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 687-706, July.
    5. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    6. Alesina, Alberto & Perotti, Roberto, 1996. "Income distribution, political instability, and investment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1203-1228, June.
    7. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    8. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    9. Stephen Nickell & Luca Nunziata & Wolfgang Ochel, 2005. "Unemployment in the OECD Since the 1960s. What Do We Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 1-27, January.
    10. Acocella, Nicola & Di Bartolomeo, Giovanni & Tirelli, Patrizio, 2009. "The macroeconomics of social pacts," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 202-213, October.
    11. Nicola Acocella & Giovanni Bartolomeo & Wilfried Pauwels, 2010. "Is there any scope for corporatism in macroeconomic policies?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 403-424, November.
    12. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2007. "The determinants of unemployment across OECD countries: Reassessing the role of policies and institutions," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2006(1), pages 7-86.
    13. Paul De Grauwe & Frauke Skudelny, 1999. "Social Conflict and Growth in Euroland," Working Papers Department of Economics ces9913, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    14. Baccaro, Lucio & Rei, Diego, 2007. "Institutional Determinants of Unemployment in OECD Countries: Does the Deregulatory View Hold Water?," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(03), pages 527-569, July.
    15. Perotti, Roberto & Alesina, Alberto, 1996. "Income Distribution, Political Instability, and Investment," Scholarly Articles 4553018, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporatism; Conflict management; Economic growth; C23; D72; O43;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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