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Firm Credit Experience and Perceptions of Lending Policy: Business Survey Evidence from Austria

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  • Hainz, Christa
  • Fidrmuc, Jarko
  • Hölzl, Werner

Abstract

Bank lending has been a major concern since the financial crisis. We study the effect of a firm’s own credit market experience on its perceived bank lending policy using the Austrian Business Climate Survey between 2011 and 2014 and. Our results show that firms’ perceptions of aggregate lending policy depend on their individual credit market experience. Only if they get the loan at the expected terms, firms are more likely to perceive the banks’ lending policy positively. Moreover, firms are more likely to update their perceptions during the period in which they need a loan. Our results are in line with theories on sticky information, rational inattention and pessimism bias when forming perceptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Hainz, Christa & Fidrmuc, Jarko & Hölzl, Werner, 2016. "Firm Credit Experience and Perceptions of Lending Policy: Business Survey Evidence from Austria," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145863, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145863
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yao-Min Chiang & David Hirshleifer & Yiming Qian & Ann E. Sherman, 2011. "Do Investors Learn from Experience? Evidence from Frequent IPO Investors," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(5), pages 1560-1589.
    2. Campello, Murillo & Graham, John R. & Harvey, Campbell R., 2010. "The real effects of financial constraints: Evidence from a financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 470-487, September.
    3. Ricardo Reis, 2006. "Inattentive Producers," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 793-821.
    4. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    5. Ulrike Malmendier & Stefan Nagel, 2016. "Learning from Inflation Experiences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(1), pages 53-87.
    6. Camelia M. Kuhnen, 2015. "Asymmetric Learning from Financial Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(5), pages 2029-2062, October.
    7. Souleles, Nicholas S, 2004. "Expectations, Heterogeneous Forecast Errors, and Consumption: Micro Evidence from the Michigan Consumer Sentiment Surveys," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 36(1), pages 39-72, February.
    8. Lamla, Michael J. & Lein, Sarah M., 2014. "The role of media for consumers’ inflation expectation formation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 62-77.
    9. Sims, Christopher A., 2003. "Implications of rational inattention," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 665-690, April.
    10. Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2010. "News and households' subjective macroeconomic expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 469-475, March.
    11. repec:hrv:faseco:32193497 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ulrike Malmendier & Stefan Nagel, 2011. "Depression Babies: Do Macroeconomic Experiences Affect Risk Taking?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 373-416.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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