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Healthcare financing in OECD countries beyond the public-private split

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  • Götze, Ralf
  • Schmid, Achim

Abstract

Background: Studies of long-term trends in the healthcare financing mix generally focus on a dichotomous concept discerning public from private funding sources. More detailed analyses of the funding mix tend to be restricted to a small number of cases or do rarely examine time trends. Aim: This paper enhances the existing body of literature by developing and applying a trichotomous concept for healthcare funding, distinguishing taxes, contributions, and private sources. This includes a new aggregated indicator for the mix of three financing sources and its graphical representation. Methods: The study mainly builds upon OECD Health Data 2011. We measure changes in the funding mix since 1972 as its distance from a funding mix that equally draws upon taxes, contributions and private sources. Results: Up to 1980, the OECD healthcare systems move toward ideal-typical financing schemes. Between 1980 and 2000, the funding mix hybridizes mainly driven by privatization processes in NHS and social insurance countries and ongoing switch-over-processes between these two healthcare system types. Since 2000, OECD countries again tend toward ideal-typical funding schemes. Discussion: We use the framework for institutional change developed by Streeck and Thelen. The quantitative approach highlights changes in terms of displacement, layering, and drift but fails to fully reveal conversion processes. Therefore, further qualitative research is needed to capture not only shifts between the funding sources but also more gradual changes within them. Conclusion: The back-and-forth development of the trichotomous funding mix challenges assumptions of a universal trend toward hybrid financing structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Götze, Ralf & Schmid, Achim, 2012. "Healthcare financing in OECD countries beyond the public-private split," TranState Working Papers 160, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:sfb597:160
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    1. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 2000. "International comparisons of health expenditure: Theory, data and econometric analysis," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 11-53 Elsevier.
    2. Adam Wagstaff, 2010. "Social health insurance reexamined," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 503-517.
    3. Pedro Pita Barros, 2007. "The slow and unnoticed changes in the funding mix," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(5), pages 437-440.
    4. Castles, Francis G., 2004. "The Future of the Welfare State: Crisis Myths and Crisis Realities," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199273928.
    5. Bärnighausen, Till & Sauerborn, Rainer, 2002. "One hundred and eighteen years of the German health insurance system: are there any lessons for middle- and low-income countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 54(10), pages 1559-1587, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ewelina Nojszewska, 2015. "Public and private funding of the health care in Poland – the current state and proposals of solutions (Publiczne i prywatne finansowanie ochrony zdrowia w Polsce – stan obecny i propozycje rozwiazan)," Problemy Zarzadzania, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 13(53), pages 15-36.
    2. Fan, Victoria Y. & Savedoff, William D., 2014. "The health financing transition: A conceptual framework and empirical evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 112-121.

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