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Global Food Prices and Business Cycle Dynamics in an Emerging Market Economy

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  • Holtemöller, Oliver
  • Mallick, Sushanta

Abstract

This paper investigates a perception in the political debates as to what extent poor countries are affected by price movements in the global commodity markets. To test this perception, we use the case of India to establish in a standard SVAR model that global food prices influence aggregate prices and food prices in India. To further analyze these empirical results, we specify a small open economy New-Keynesian model including oil and food prices and estimate it using observed data over the period from 1996Q2 to 2013Q2 by applying Bayesian estimation techniques.

Suggested Citation

  • Holtemöller, Oliver & Mallick, Sushanta, 2015. "Global Food Prices and Business Cycle Dynamics in an Emerging Market Economy," IWH Discussion Papers 15/2015, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:iwh-15-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    commodity prices; food prices; New-Keynesian macroeconometric model; inflation; India; structural vector autoregressive model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • Q02 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Commodity Market

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