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The Impact of ICT on Working from Home: Evidence from EU Countries

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  • Jerbashian, Vahagn
  • Vilalta-Bufi, Montserrat

Abstract

We use data from 14 European countries and provide evidence that the fall in prices of information and communication technologies (ICT) is associated with a significant increase in the share of employees who work from home. Similar results hold within age, gender, and occupation groups. There are notable differences across age groups, however. The effect of the fall in ICT prices on working from home increases with age. A rationale for such a result is that the preference for working from home increases with age.

Suggested Citation

  • Jerbashian, Vahagn & Vilalta-Bufi, Montserrat, 2020. "The Impact of ICT on Working from Home: Evidence from EU Countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 719, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:719
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Vahagn Jerbashian & Anna Kochanova, 2016. "The impact of doing business regulations on investments in ICT," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 991-1008, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jose Maria Barrero & Nicholas Bloom & Steven J. Davis, 2020. "Why Working From Home Will Stick," Working Papers 2020-174, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Working from Home; ICT; Age; Gender; Occupations;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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