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The Changing Nature of Gender Selection into Employment: Europe over the Great Recession

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  • Juan J. Dolado
  • Garcia-Peñalosa, Cecilia
  • Tarasonis, Linas

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to evaluate the role played by selectivity issues induced by nonemployment in explaining gender wage gap patterns in the EU since the onset of the Great Recession. We show that male selection into the labour market, traditionally disregarded, has increased. This is particularly the case in peripheral EU countries, where dramatic drops in male unskilled jobs have taken place during the crisis. As regards female selection, traditionally positive, we document mixed findings. While it has declined in some countries, as a result of increasing female LFP due to an added-worker effect, it has become even more positive in other countries. This is due to adverse labour demand shifts in industries which are intensive in temporary work where women are over-represented. These adverse shifts may have more than offset the rise in unskilled female labour supply.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan J. Dolado & Garcia-Peñalosa, Cecilia & Tarasonis, Linas, 2017. "The Changing Nature of Gender Selection into Employment: Europe over the Great Recession," GLO Discussion Paper Series 34, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:34
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    1. Brindusa Anghel & Henrique Basso & Olympia Bover & José María Casado & Laura Hospido & Mario Izquierdo & Ivan A. Kataryniuk & Aitor Lacuesta & José Manuel Montero & Elena Vozmediano, 2018. "Income, consumption and wealth inequality in Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 351-387, November.
    2. Etienne Lalé & Linas Tarasonis, 2019. "The Life-cycle Profile of Worker Flows in Europe: an Empirical Investigation," Bank of Lithuania Discussion Paper Series 16, Bank of Lithuania.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sample selection; gender wage gaps; gender employment gaps;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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