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Business services as actors of knowledge transformation and diffusion: some empirical findings on the role of KIBS in regional and national innovation systems


  • Muller, Emmanuel
  • Zenker, Andrea


Over the last years, there has been a significant increase in the attention paid to the activities of knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS). KIBS produce and duffus knowledge, which is crucial for innovation processes. The paper gives an overview of the role and function of KIBS in innovation systems and their knowledge production, transformation and diffusion activities. Focusing on innovation interactions between manufacturing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and KIBS; the empirical analyses gasps KIBS in position in five contexts. The analysis leads to the conclusion that innovation activities links SMEs and KIBS through the process of knowledge and diffiusion.

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  • Muller, Emmanuel & Zenker, Andrea, 2001. "Business services as actors of knowledge transformation and diffusion: some empirical findings on the role of KIBS in regional and national innovation systems," Working Papers "Firms and Region" R2/2001, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fisifr:r22001

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Ancori, Bernard & Bureth, Antoine & Cohendet, Patrick, 2000. "The Economics of Knowledge: The Debate about Codification and and Tacit Knowledge," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 255-287, June.
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    8. Nelson, Richard R & Winter, Sidney G, 1975. "Growth Theory from an Evolutionary Perspective: The Differential Productivity Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 338-344, May.
    9. Cohendet, Patrick & Steinmueller, W Edward, 2000. "The Codification of Knowledge: A Conceptual and Empirical Exploration," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 195-209, June.
    10. Cowan, Robin & David, Paul A & Foray, Dominique, 2000. "The Explicit Economics of Knowledge Codification and Tacitness," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 211-253, June.
    11. Dirk Czarnitzki & Alfred Spielkamp, 2003. "Business services in Germany: bridges for innovation," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 1-30, March.
    12. Koschatzky, Knut & Zenker, Andrea, 1999. "The regional embeddedness of small manufacturing and service firms: regional networking as knowledge source for innovation?," Working Papers "Firms and Region" R2/1999, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Andersson & Florian Noseleit, 2011. "Start-ups and employment dynamics within and across sectors," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 461-483, May.
    2. Michael Wyrwich, 2011. "Knowledge intensive Entrepreneurship across regions: Makes being a new industry a difference?," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1711, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Thorsten Bohn, 2003. "Knowledge Intensive Business Services in Regional Systems of Innovation - Initial Results from the Case of Southeast-Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa03p161, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Creplet, F. & Dupouet, O. & Kern, F. & Mehmanpazir, B. & Munier, F., 2001. "Consultants and experts in management consulting firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 1517-1535, December.
    5. Rachel Levy & Pascale Roux & Sandrine Wolff, 2009. "An analysis of science–industry collaborative patterns in a large European University," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 1-23, February.
    6. Pilar Arroyo López & Lourdes Cárcamo Solís, 2009. "El desarrollo de KIBS en México El sector servicios en el contexto de la economía del conocimiento," Economia y Sociedad., Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Facultad de Economia, issue 23, pages 65-78, Enero-Jun.
    7. José García-Quevedo & Francisco Mas-Verdú & Daniel Montolio, 2011. "What type of innovative firms acquire knowledge intensive services and from which suppliers?," Working Papers 2011/22, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    8. Roberto Antonietti & Giulio Cainelli, 2011. "Geographic concentration and vertical disintegration in KIBS: evidence from the metropolitan area of Milan," Openloc Working Papers 1105, Public policies and local development.
    9. Zoltán Bujdosó & János Pénzes & Lóránt Dávid & Szilárd Madaras, 2016. "The Spatial Pattern of KIBS and their Relations with the Territorial Development in Romania," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 18(41), pages 1-73, February.

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