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The green game changer: An empirical assessment of the effects of wind and solar power on the merit order

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  • Böckers, Veit
  • Giessing, Leonie
  • Rösch, Jürgen

Abstract

We estimate the impact of renewable energy sources on the merit order and the wholesale price in Spain. We use a structural vectorautoregressive model for the merit order of production and argue that wind and solar production are exogenous to the system. As expected the overall effect is negative for the wholesale price and the produced quantities of most generation technologies. The estimated impact, however, is biggest for mid-merit plants. This finding sheds light on the theoretical discussion about which power plants are affected most by renewable energy sources. The effect is also mainly driven by wind power. Solar energy increases wholesale prices as peak plants enlarge their production with more solar power.

Suggested Citation

  • Böckers, Veit & Giessing, Leonie & Rösch, Jürgen, 2013. "The green game changer: An empirical assessment of the effects of wind and solar power on the merit order," DICE Discussion Papers 104, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:dicedp:104
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    Cited by:

    1. Sánchez de la Nieta, A.A. & Contreras, J., 2020. "Quantifying the effect of renewable generation on day–ahead electricity market prices: The Spanish case," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C).
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    3. Jenniches, Simon & Worrell, Ernst & Fumagalli, Elena, 2019. "Regional economic and environmental impacts of wind power developments: A case study of a German region," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 499-514.
    4. Winkler, Jenny & Gaio, Alberto & Pfluger, Benjamin & Ragwitz, Mario, 2016. "Impact of renewables on electricity markets – Do support schemes matter?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 157-167.
    5. Li Li & Junqi Liu & Lei Zhu, 2020. "Dynamics of energy technology diffusion under uncertainty," Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 36(5), pages 795-808, September.

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