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Complexity and doctor choices when discussing contraceptives

Author

Listed:
  • Fiebig, D.G.
  • Viney, R.
  • Haas, M.
  • Knox, S.
  • Street, D.
  • Weisberg, E.
  • Bateson, D.

Abstract

In order to better understand choice behaviour, econometric models need to be able to reflect the complexity of decisions that individuals routinely face. We investigate the role of choice complexity in modelling medical decision-making in the case of a doctor choosing which specific contraceptive products to discuss with their patient before ultimately making a recommendation. Clinical vignettes describing patients, developed using stated preference methods, are presented to a sample of Australian general practitioners. An econometric model is developed that captures two salient sources of complexity. The first is associated with patients with particularcombinations of clinical and demographic attributes that induce uncertainty around what product to recommend while the second captures variation in the ability of doctors to find appropriate patient-product matches. We are especially interested in the tendencies of doctors to discuss long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) in order to determine whether part of the explanation for the relatively low uptake of LARC in Australia is reluctance on the part of some doctors to even discuss these products.

Suggested Citation

  • Fiebig, D.G. & Viney, R. & Haas, M. & Knox, S. & Street, D. & Weisberg, E. & Bateson, D., 2015. "Complexity and doctor choices when discussing contraceptives," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:15/14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:patien:v:10:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s40271-017-0245-9 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    choice models; complex decisions; medical decision making; long-acting reversible contraception; clinical vignettes;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access

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