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Childhood Health and the Business Cycle: Evidence from Western Europe

Listed author(s):
  • Angelini, V.
  • Mierau, J.O.

We analyze the relationship between the business cycle and childhood health. We use a retrospective survey on self-reported childhood health for 10 Western European countries and combine it with historically and internationally comparable data on the Gross Domestic Product. We validate the self-reported data by comparing them to realized illness spells. We find a positive relationship between being born in and growing up during a recession and childhood health. This relationship is not driven by selection effects due to heightened infant mortality during recessions. As the business cycle is exogenous from the individual perspective, our results can be considered causal.

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File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/herc/wp/12_28.pdf
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Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 12/28.

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Date of creation: Oct 2012
Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:12/28
Contact details of provider: Postal:
HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom

Phone: (0)1904 323776
Web page: https://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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  14. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper is not listed on IDEAS
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  19. repec:pri:cheawb:adriana_booms.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
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  28. repec:pri:cheawb:adriana_booms is not listed on IDEAS
  29. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_economic_status_paper.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
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