IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Spatial Analysis of Regional Income Inequality

  • Sergio J. Rey

    (San Diego State University)

Questions surrounding regional economic convergence have commanded a great deal of recent attention in economics literature. As in other recent cases in the social sciences, the application of spatially explicit methods of data analysis to the convergence question has yielded important insights on regional economic growth. By contrast, the literature on regional income inequality, although somewhat older than the convergence literature, has been slower to adopt new spatially explicit methods of data analysis. This chapter helps to speed that adoption by investigating the role of spatial dependence and spatial scale in the analysis of regional income inequality in the US over the 1929-2000 period. The findings reveal a strong positive relationship between measures of inequality in state incomes and the degree of spatial autocorrelation. Additionally, a geographically based decomposition of inequality highlights a strong positive relationship between the interregional inequality share (as opposed to intraregional inequality) and spatial clustering. Finally, a new approach to inference in regional inequality analysis is suggested and demonstrated as providing a formal explanatory framework to complement the broad, but descriptive approaches in the existing literature.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/urb/papers/0110/0110002.pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/urb/papers/0110/0110002.ps.gz
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Urban/Regional with number 0110002.

as
in new window

Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 15 Oct 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0110002
Note: Type of Document - postscript; prepared on PC Debian GNU/Linux tetex; to print on HP/PostScript; pages: 21; figures: included
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1984. "Inequality Decomposition by Population Subgroups," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(6), pages 1369-85, November.
  2. Paci, Raffaele & Pigliaru, Francesco, 1997. "Structural change and convergence: an Italian regional perspective," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 297-318, August.
  3. Zheng, Buhong & J. Cushing, Brian, 2001. "Statistical inference for testing inequality indices with dependent samples," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 315-335, April.
  4. Durlauf, Steven N. & Quah, Danny T., 1999. "The new empirics of economic growth," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 235-308 Elsevier.
  5. M. Chatterji & J. H. Ll. Dewhurst, 1996. "Convergence Clubs and Relative Economic Performance in Great Britain: 1977-1991," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 31-39.
  6. Zhang, Siao-Bo & Kanbur, Ravi, 1999. "What Difference Do Polarization Measures Make? An Application To China," Working Papers 7224, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  7. Mills, Jeffrey A & Zandvakili, Sourushe, 1997. "Statistical Inference via Bootstrapping for Measures of Inequality," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 133-50, March-Apr.
  8. Amnon Levy & Khorshed Chowdhury, 1995. "A Geographical Decomposition of Intercountry Income Inequality," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 37(4), pages 1-17, December.
  9. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1991. "Convergence across States and Regions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 107-182.
  10. Amos, Orley Jr., 1988. "Unbalanced regional growth and regional income inequality in the latter stages of development," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 549-566, November.
  11. Tsui Kai-yuen, 1993. "Decomposition of China's Regional Inequalities," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 600-627, September.
  12. Carlos R. Azzoni, 2001. "Economic growth and regional income inequality in Brazil," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 133-152.
  13. Cowell, Frank A & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "How Much Inequality Can We Explain? A Methodology and an Application to the United States," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 421-30, March.
  14. Barro, Robert J & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Convergence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 223-51, April.
  15. Philip Maxwell & Matthew Peter, 1988. "Income Inequality in Small Regions: A Study of Australian Statistical Divisions," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 18(1), pages 19-27, Winter.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0110002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.