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The Porter Hypothesis Revisited: A Literature Review of Theoretical Models and Empirical Tests

  • Marcus Wagner

    (CSM, Univ. Lueneburg)

The debate on the relationship between environmental regulation and competitiveness has been a topic of discussion for a number of years now. As early as 1991, the American economist Michael E. Porter proposed that stringent environmental regulation (under the condition that it is efficient) can lead to win-win situations, in which social welfare as well as the private net benefits of firms operating under such regulation can be increased. This paper analyses the Porter hypothesis with regard to two aspects. Firstly, it will analyse the theoretical reasoning behind the hypothesis by discussing and analyzing the arguments brought forward in favour of and against the hypothesis based on the discussion of different theoretical analyses and models by various authors in the field. Secondly, the paper reviews influential empirical studies trying to test the Porter hypothesis. The analysis of empirical work will allow (at least to some degree) to assess whether theoretical conclusions about the Porter hypothesis are confirmed by empirical research.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/pe/papers/0407/0407014.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Public Economics with number 0407014.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: 25 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0407014
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 50
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  1. Pizer, William & Morgenstern, Richard & Shih, Jhih-Shyang, 1999. "Jobs Versus the Environment: An Industry-level Perspective," Discussion Papers dp-99-01-rev, Resources For the Future.
  2. Eliste, Paavo & Fredriksson, Per G., 2002. "Environmental Regulations, Transfers, and Trade: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 234-250, March.
  3. Montero, Juan-Pablo, 2002. "Permits, Standards, and Technology Innovation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 23-44, July.
  4. Schmalensee, Richard., 1987. "Inter-industry studies of structure and performance," Working papers 1874-87., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  5. Gabel H. Landis & Sinclair-Desgagne Bernard, 1993. "Managerial Incentives and Environmental Compliance," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 229-240, May.
  6. Hahn, Robert W, 1989. "Economic Prescriptions for Environmental Problems: How the Patient Followed the Doctor's Orders," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 95-114, Spring.
  7. Rennings, Klaus & Ziegler, Andreas & Zwick, Thomas, 2001. "Employment changes in environmentally innovative firms," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-46, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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