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A managerial perspective on the Porter hypothesis The case of CO2 emissions

  • Diane-Laure Arjaliès

    (Department of Economics, Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS : UMR7176 - Polytechnique - X, PhD Program - ESSEC Business School)

  • Jean-Pierre Ponssard

    (Department of Economics, Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS : UMR7176 - Polytechnique - X)

investors and companies are increasingly aware that climate change and its associated needs for reducing CO2 emissions are likely to impact structurally many areas of the economy. This paper offers a contribution to understand these impacts on companies' strategy, by studying management systems. A typology is introduced based upon a two stage model. At stage one, the firm becomes aware of the risk and CO2 is a compliance issue. At stage two, the firm is involved in a more global re-assessment of its business portfolio including its relationship with suppliers and clients. The construction is based on three case studies: DuPont (chemicals), Lafarge (building materials) and Unilever (consumer goods). The implications of the analysis for investors are drawn.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-00445847.

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Date of creation: Jan 2010
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Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00445847
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  1. Marcus Wagner, 2004. "The Porter Hypothesis Revisited: A Literature Review of Theoretical Models and Empirical Tests," Public Economics 0407014, EconWPA.
  2. Linden, Henry R., 2007. "Alarmist Misrepresentations of the Findings of the Latest Scientific Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 20(7), pages 38-46.
  3. William D. Nordhaus, 2006. "The "Stern Review" on the Economics of Climate Change," NBER Working Papers 12741, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Stefan Ambec & Philippe Barla, 2001. "A Theoretical Foundation of the Porter Hypothesis," CSEF Working Papers 54, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  5. Jean Pierre Ponssard & Neil Walker, 2008. "EU emissions trading and the cement sector: a spatial competition analysis," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(5), pages 467-493, September.
  6. repec:inr:wpaper:249906 is not listed on IDEAS
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