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Environmental regulations, induced R&D, and productivity: Evidence from Taiwan's manufacturing industries

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  • Yang, Chih-Hai
  • Tseng, Yu-Hsuan
  • Chen, Chiang-Ping

Abstract

This paper examines whether stringent environmental regulations induce more R&D and promote further productivity in Taiwan. Using an industry-level panel dataset for the 1997–2003 period, empirical results show that pollution abatement fees, a proxy for environmental regulations, is positively related to R&D expenditure, implying that stronger environment protection induces more R&D. On the other hand, pollution abatement capital expenditures do not have a statistically significant influence on R&D. Further evaluation of the influence of induced R&D by environment regulations on industrial productivity shows a significant positive association between them. This finding supports the Porter hypothesis that more stringent environmental regulations may enhance rather than lower industrial competitiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Chih-Hai & Tseng, Yu-Hsuan & Chen, Chiang-Ping, 2012. "Environmental regulations, induced R&D, and productivity: Evidence from Taiwan's manufacturing industries," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 514-532.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:34:y:2012:i:4:p:514-532
    DOI: 10.1016/j.reseneeco.2012.05.001
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chiara Franco & Giovanni Marin, 2017. "The Effect of Within-Sector, Upstream and Downstream Environmental Taxes on Innovation and Productivity," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 66(2), pages 261-291, February.
    2. Antonietti,Roberto & Marzucchi,Alberto, 2013. "Green investment strategies and export performance: A firm-level investigation," INGENIO (CSIC-UPV) Working Paper Series 201302, INGENIO (CSIC-UPV).
    3. repec:spr:nathaz:v:91:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11069-017-3137-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Qizhong YANG & Tsunehiro OTSUKI, 2017. "The Product-Related Environmental Regulation, Innovation, and Competitiveness: Empirical Evidence from Malaysian and Vietnamese Firms," OSIPP Discussion Paper 17E007, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    5. Albrizio, Silvia & Kozluk, Tomasz & Zipperer, Vera, 2017. "Environmental policies and productivity growth: Evidence across industries and firms," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 209-226.
    6. Marin, Giovanni, 2014. "Do eco-innovations harm productivity growth through crowding out? Results of an extended CDM model for Italy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 301-317.
    7. Skeete, Jean-Paul, 2017. "Examining the role of policy design and policy interaction in EU automotive emissions performance gaps," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 373-381.
    8. Borghesi, Simone & Cainelli, Giulio & Mazzanti, Massimiliano, 2015. "Linking emission trading to environmental innovation: Evidence from the Italian manufacturing industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 669-683.
    9. repec:prp:uppmos:978-961-7023-53-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:energy:v:128:y:2017:i:c:p:575-585 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Chiara Franco & Giovanni Marin, 2013. "The Effect of Within-Sector, Upstream and Downstream Energy Taxes on Innovation and Productivity," SEEDS Working Papers 0214, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Jan 2014.
    12. repec:eee:resene:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:105-123 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Tommy Lundgren & Per-Olov Marklund, 2015. "Climate policy, environmental performance, and profits," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 225-235, December.
    14. Wang, Yan & Shen, Neng, 2016. "Environmental regulation and environmental productivity: The case of China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 758-766.
    15. Xie, Rong-hui & Yuan, Yi-jun & Huang, Jing-jing, 2017. "Different Types of Environmental Regulations and Heterogeneous Influence on “Green” Productivity: Evidence from China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 104-112.
    16. Lorena D’Agostino, 2015. "How MNEs respond to environmental regulation: integrating the Porter hypothesis and the pollution haven hypothesis," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 32(2), pages 245-269, August.
    17. Lan, Jing & Munro, Alistair & Liu, Zhen, 2017. "Environmental regulatory stringency and the market for abatement goods and services in China," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 105-123.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental regulations; R&D; Productivity; Porter hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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