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Human Capital Composition, Growth and Development in an R&D Endogenous Growth Model

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  • Tiago Neves Sequeira

    (U Nova de Lisboa & U Beira Interior)

Abstract

The effect of human capital on growth and development has been somewhat neglected in economic literature. However, evidence has suggested the importance of engineering and technical skills to economic growth. Simultaneously, European Commission and OECD has presented data that reveal the shortage of these fields of science in developed countries. Using a standard increasing-variety endogenous growth model, we propose various measures of this composition, namely the ratio of high-tech to total human capital and the ratio of high to low-tech human capital. We show that allocation matters in what growth and development are concerned. We also show that the decentralized equilibrium leads to less investment in high-techs than does the social planner and the tendency to under-invest in R&D is expanded under the presence of human capital composition. When compared to data, the model does well in explaining the rate of growth and the level of development (less robustly) as a function of these measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Tiago Neves Sequeira, 2003. "Human Capital Composition, Growth and Development in an R&D Endogenous Growth Model," Macroeconomics 0310015, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0310015
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on win98; pages: 48
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Funke, Michael & Strulik, Holger, 2000. "On endogenous growth with physical capital, human capital and product variety," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 491-515, March.
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    3. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    7. Ricardo J. Caballero & Adam B. Jaffe, 1993. "How High are the Giants' Shoulders: An Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Spillovers and Creative Destruction in a Model of Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1993, Volume 8, pages 15-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    10. Crafts, N. F. R., 1995. "Exogenous or Endogenous Growth? The Industrial Revolution Reconsidered," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(04), pages 745-772, December.
    11. Richard R. Nelson & Edmond S. Phelps, 1965. "Investment in Humans, Technological Diffusion and Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 189, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    12. Robert J. Barro, 2001. "Human Capital and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 12-17, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neves Sequeira Tiago & Reis Ana B, 2006. "Human Capital Composition, R&D and the Increasing Role of Services," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-25, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital Composition; Growth; Development; R&D;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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